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Gustav Stolper, Der deutsche Volkswirt, and the Controversy on Economic Policy at the End of the Weimar Republic

Gustav Stolper, Der deutsche Volkswirt, and the Controversy on Economic Policy at the End of the... History of Political Economy 33:2 (2001) this regard was the role of public opinion that, mainly out of fear of inflation and of depreciation of the currency, reacted hostilely to expansionist proposals. Therefore, it might be rewarding to look at the position of one of Germany’s leading economic weeklies, namely, Der deutsche Volkswirt (hereafter, DV ), edited by the well-known journalist, economist, and politician Gustav Stolper, and its contributions to the controversy surrounding Brüning’s economic policy.2 The relevance of this study derives from the unique role of Stolper and the DV in shaping public opinion on the economic and political affairs of the Weimar republic. Stolper founded the paper in 1926; it was immensely successful, quickly climbing to a circulation of 10,000. Moreover, it initiated theory-based debates on current economic issues and thereby—supported by Stolper’s political activities as a member of the Reichstag3—exercised some influence on German economic policy. To name but two examples, Wilhelm Röpke (1933, 429), in his account of German business cycle policy, refers to the DV as one of those “two leading periodicals” that “warmly supported, and probably rather influenced” the laissez-faire view of the Brüning government. Similarly, in retrospect, George Garvy (1975, 398) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Gustav Stolper, Der deutsche Volkswirt, and the Controversy on Economic Policy at the End of the Weimar Republic

History of Political Economy , Volume 33 (2) – Jun 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-33-2-241
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

History of Political Economy 33:2 (2001) this regard was the role of public opinion that, mainly out of fear of inflation and of depreciation of the currency, reacted hostilely to expansionist proposals. Therefore, it might be rewarding to look at the position of one of Germany’s leading economic weeklies, namely, Der deutsche Volkswirt (hereafter, DV ), edited by the well-known journalist, economist, and politician Gustav Stolper, and its contributions to the controversy surrounding Brüning’s economic policy.2 The relevance of this study derives from the unique role of Stolper and the DV in shaping public opinion on the economic and political affairs of the Weimar republic. Stolper founded the paper in 1926; it was immensely successful, quickly climbing to a circulation of 10,000. Moreover, it initiated theory-based debates on current economic issues and thereby—supported by Stolper’s political activities as a member of the Reichstag3—exercised some influence on German economic policy. To name but two examples, Wilhelm Röpke (1933, 429), in his account of German business cycle policy, refers to the DV as one of those “two leading periodicals” that “warmly supported, and probably rather influenced” the laissez-faire view of the Brüning government. Similarly, in retrospect, George Garvy (1975, 398)

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2001

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