German Orientalism: Introduction

German Orientalism: Introduction Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 24:2 (2004) without comment, from one text to another. Ideas are propagated and disseminated anonymously, they are repeated without attribution; they have literally become idées reçues.”10 Said illustrates the point with Gustave Flaubert’s bumbling fictional clerks, Bouvard and Pecuchet, who spend their time contentedly copying their “received ideas” from one book to another. Re ceived ideas about the Orient enabled British and French colonial expansion throughout the Eastern Mediterranean—the specific focus of Said’s book—before passing into the ideological arsenal of the United States following World War II. The book’s impact was so powerful that following its publication it became impossible to separate the analysis of Orientalist scholarship from an awareness of the colonial contexts that created and sustained it.11 Yet this strong focus on a connection between Orientalism and a particular form of European colonialism excluded other Orientalisms from consideration. Conceptually, the topic was much broader, taking in a panoply of possible “interests.” As Said writes, Orientalism was: a distribution of geopolitical awareness into aesthetic, scholarly, economic, sociological, historical and philological texts; it is an elaboration not only of a basic geographical distinction ... but also of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1548-226X
DOI
10.1215/1089201X-24-2-97
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 24:2 (2004) without comment, from one text to another. Ideas are propagated and disseminated anonymously, they are repeated without attribution; they have literally become idées reçues.”10 Said illustrates the point with Gustave Flaubert’s bumbling fictional clerks, Bouvard and Pecuchet, who spend their time contentedly copying their “received ideas” from one book to another. Re ceived ideas about the Orient enabled British and French colonial expansion throughout the Eastern Mediterranean—the specific focus of Said’s book—before passing into the ideological arsenal of the United States following World War II. The book’s impact was so powerful that following its publication it became impossible to separate the analysis of Orientalist scholarship from an awareness of the colonial contexts that created and sustained it.11 Yet this strong focus on a connection between Orientalism and a particular form of European colonialism excluded other Orientalisms from consideration. Conceptually, the topic was much broader, taking in a panoply of possible “interests.” As Said writes, Orientalism was: a distribution of geopolitical awareness into aesthetic, scholarly, economic, sociological, historical and philological texts; it is an elaboration not only of a basic geographical distinction ... but also of a

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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