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Gay Rights versus Human Rights: A Response to Joseph Massad

Gay Rights versus Human Rights: A Response to Joseph Massad Public Culture 15(3): 587–591 Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press Public Culture article—and this is the true reason for the animosity of our Christian Palestinian writer: he resents being in the same category as Israelis and Turks. Like a spoilt child, he does not judge articles on their internal logic but compares them with the article he would have liked to have written. Massad writes: [Arno] Schmitt . . . makes the essentialist claim that the absence of these categories in the Muslim world is a phenomenon that remains constant over time. Although [John] Boswell was careful to restrict his pronouncements . . . to the classical period of Islam—the seventh through fourteenth centuries—recent scholars, including Schmitt, tend to extend whatever judgment they have to the whole of Arab Muslim history (this is tantamount to using studies of the European medieval period to generalize about all of Western history). Schmitt, like orientalist scholars who use the seventh-century Qur’an to study Muslims of the twentieth century, insists without any scholarly evidence that “ . . . the behavior of Muslims today can be seen as modification of older behavioral patterns. . . .” . . . Everett Rowson http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Gay Rights versus Human Rights: A Response to Joseph Massad

Public Culture , Volume 15 (3) – Oct 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-15-3-587
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Public Culture 15(3): 587–591 Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press Public Culture article—and this is the true reason for the animosity of our Christian Palestinian writer: he resents being in the same category as Israelis and Turks. Like a spoilt child, he does not judge articles on their internal logic but compares them with the article he would have liked to have written. Massad writes: [Arno] Schmitt . . . makes the essentialist claim that the absence of these categories in the Muslim world is a phenomenon that remains constant over time. Although [John] Boswell was careful to restrict his pronouncements . . . to the classical period of Islam—the seventh through fourteenth centuries—recent scholars, including Schmitt, tend to extend whatever judgment they have to the whole of Arab Muslim history (this is tantamount to using studies of the European medieval period to generalize about all of Western history). Schmitt, like orientalist scholars who use the seventh-century Qur’an to study Muslims of the twentieth century, insists without any scholarly evidence that “ . . . the behavior of Muslims today can be seen as modification of older behavioral patterns. . . .” . . . Everett Rowson

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2003

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