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FROM THE STRAIGHT MIND TO QUEER THEORY: Implications for Political Movement

FROM THE STRAIGHT MIND TO QUEER THEORY: Implications for Political Movement From the Straight mind to Queer theory implications for Diane Griffin Crowder rage, savoring the image of a glorious war where, for once, “elles” won. It was 1975, and the American feminist movement was making great strides in abolishing unjust laws. Three years later I was in a huge room packed with people to hear a lecture by Monique Wittig titled “The Straight Mind.” I was as astonished as most of the audience when Wittig dramatically concluded with the now famous phrase: “Lesbians are not women.” People did not quite comprehend what she was saying. Wittig’s mission to eliminate the very concepts of sex and gender, so clear to her and a small group of other French feminist thinkers, made no sense to me. It was only later, when Wittig began to publish her philosophical articles, that we could see the radical implications of that little phrase. If I begin with these personal memories, it is to remind us of the context in which those articles appeared in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. With a few notable exceptions, American feminists accepted biological sex as a given and sought to alter gender roles to end the oppression http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

FROM THE STRAIGHT MIND TO QUEER THEORY: Implications for Political Movement

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1064-2684
DOI
10.1215/10642684-2007-004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From the Straight mind to Queer theory implications for Diane Griffin Crowder rage, savoring the image of a glorious war where, for once, “elles” won. It was 1975, and the American feminist movement was making great strides in abolishing unjust laws. Three years later I was in a huge room packed with people to hear a lecture by Monique Wittig titled “The Straight Mind.” I was as astonished as most of the audience when Wittig dramatically concluded with the now famous phrase: “Lesbians are not women.” People did not quite comprehend what she was saying. Wittig’s mission to eliminate the very concepts of sex and gender, so clear to her and a small group of other French feminist thinkers, made no sense to me. It was only later, when Wittig began to publish her philosophical articles, that we could see the radical implications of that little phrase. If I begin with these personal memories, it is to remind us of the context in which those articles appeared in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. With a few notable exceptions, American feminists accepted biological sex as a given and sought to alter gender roles to end the oppression

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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