From the Mohawk-Mahican War to the Beaver Wars: Questioning the Pattern

From the Mohawk-Mahican War to the Beaver Wars: Questioning the Pattern William A. Starna and José António Brandao ˜ hence, economic strategies employed by the Mohawks in this war presaged or established the pattern for Iroquois involvement in the Beaver Wars cannot be sustained. Instead, the actions of the Mohawks were but a continuation of the enmity that characterized Indian relationships throughout the St. Lawrence and the lower Great Lakes region, and they were only loosely tied to any of the economic concerns of the fur trade.5 By about 1580, the St. Lawrence Iroquoians had been driven from their villages by the Hurons, the Mohawks, and perhaps other Iroquois groups.6 Their remaining populations were absorbed by the Huron-Petuns, the eastern Iroquois, the Abenakis, and possibly the Ottawa River Algonquians.7 Also about this time, noticeable quantities of European goods entered the St. Lawrence Valley and began to appear among the eastern Iroquois.8 The valley above Tadoussac, formerly the home of the St. Lawrence Iroquoians, remained essentially devoid of permanently residing Indians into the seventeenth century, although it was not devoid of conflict. Indian warfare in the valley was part of a historical pattern, the origins and duration of which are lost in time, and it did not end with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnohistory Duke University Press

From the Mohawk-Mahican War to the Beaver Wars: Questioning the Pattern

Ethnohistory, Volume 51 (4) – Oct 1, 2004

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by American Society for Ethnohistory
ISSN
0014-1801
eISSN
1527-5477
DOI
10.1215/00141801-51-4-725
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

William A. Starna and José António Brandao ˜ hence, economic strategies employed by the Mohawks in this war presaged or established the pattern for Iroquois involvement in the Beaver Wars cannot be sustained. Instead, the actions of the Mohawks were but a continuation of the enmity that characterized Indian relationships throughout the St. Lawrence and the lower Great Lakes region, and they were only loosely tied to any of the economic concerns of the fur trade.5 By about 1580, the St. Lawrence Iroquoians had been driven from their villages by the Hurons, the Mohawks, and perhaps other Iroquois groups.6 Their remaining populations were absorbed by the Huron-Petuns, the eastern Iroquois, the Abenakis, and possibly the Ottawa River Algonquians.7 Also about this time, noticeable quantities of European goods entered the St. Lawrence Valley and began to appear among the eastern Iroquois.8 The valley above Tadoussac, formerly the home of the St. Lawrence Iroquoians, remained essentially devoid of permanently residing Indians into the seventeenth century, although it was not devoid of conflict. Indian warfare in the valley was part of a historical pattern, the origins and duration of which are lost in time, and it did not end with the

Journal

EthnohistoryDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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