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FROM STORAGE BOX TO COMPUTER SCREEN: Disclosing Artifacts of Queer History in Michigan

FROM STORAGE BOX TO COMPUTER SCREEN: Disclosing Artifacts of Queer History in Michigan Page 153 The GLQ Archive FROM STORAGE BOX TO COMPUTER SCREEN Disclosing Artifacts of Queer History in Michigan Tim Retzloff Commenting on the explosion of U.S. lesbian and gay history in the fifteen years since his pioneering Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities first appeared, the historian John D’Emilio writes, “At least for the twentieth century, historians are creating a multilayered, many-voiced account of a collective gay and lesbian life as complex and subtle as those we already have for ethnic and racial groups in the United States.”1 Indeed, new accounts of this collective life are increasingly frequent, building on classic texts like Allan Bérubé’s Coming Out under Fire and Lillian Faderman’s Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers as well as on groundbreaking studies by Esther Newton, George Chauncey, and Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy and Madeline D. Davis.2 A second generation, following these authors’ lead into research about America’s queer past, is closely inspecting specific locales, with such recent examples as Daneel Buring’s study of Memphis, John Howard’s book about Mississippi, Marc Stein’s work on Philadelphia, and Nan Alamilla Boyd’s upcoming treatment of San Francisco. These more academic investigations, all based on dissertations, have been joined in the historical dialogue by independent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

FROM STORAGE BOX TO COMPUTER SCREEN: Disclosing Artifacts of Queer History in Michigan

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1527-9375
DOI
10.1215/10642684-7-1-153
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 153 The GLQ Archive FROM STORAGE BOX TO COMPUTER SCREEN Disclosing Artifacts of Queer History in Michigan Tim Retzloff Commenting on the explosion of U.S. lesbian and gay history in the fifteen years since his pioneering Sexual Politics, Sexual Communities first appeared, the historian John D’Emilio writes, “At least for the twentieth century, historians are creating a multilayered, many-voiced account of a collective gay and lesbian life as complex and subtle as those we already have for ethnic and racial groups in the United States.”1 Indeed, new accounts of this collective life are increasingly frequent, building on classic texts like Allan Bérubé’s Coming Out under Fire and Lillian Faderman’s Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers as well as on groundbreaking studies by Esther Newton, George Chauncey, and Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy and Madeline D. Davis.2 A second generation, following these authors’ lead into research about America’s queer past, is closely inspecting specific locales, with such recent examples as Daneel Buring’s study of Memphis, John Howard’s book about Mississippi, Marc Stein’s work on Philadelphia, and Nan Alamilla Boyd’s upcoming treatment of San Francisco. These more academic investigations, all based on dissertations, have been joined in the historical dialogue by independent

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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