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From Revolutionaries to Politicians: Deradicalization and the Irish Experience

From Revolutionaries to Politicians: Deradicalization and the Irish Experience Page 114 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS Donnacha Ó Beacháin Fianna Fail (Soldiers of Destiny) has been Ireland’s largest political party since 1932. Founded in 1926 by nationalist revolutionary Eamon de Valera, Fianna Fail broke away from the Sinn Fein party that had led the War for Independence in the years 1919 to 1921.1 That war had ended with a Treaty negotiated between the British government and representatives of Sinn Fein, a Treaty that divided republican opinion in Ireland.2 The pragmatist view stressed the gains made: Britain had made Ireland a coequal member of the British Commonwealth, with the same legislative and executive powers as Canada. The more radical section of Sinn Fein stressed what had been lost. For them, the Treaty represented a step back from the independent united republic declared in 1916, reaffirmed in 1919, and defended by force from 1919 to 1921. The difference in perception split the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the country, leading to a bitter, ten-month civil war.3 The pragmatists won the civil war, formed a new party, Cumann na nGaedhael (Party of the Irish) and governed the Irish Free State (now the Republic of Ireland) from 1922 to 1932. The losers in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radical History Review Duke University Press

From Revolutionaries to Politicians: Deradicalization and the Irish Experience

Radical History Review , Volume 2003 (85) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc.
ISSN
0163-6545
eISSN
1534-1453
DOI
10.1215/01636545-2003-85-114
Publisher site
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Abstract

Page 114 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS Donnacha Ó Beacháin Fianna Fail (Soldiers of Destiny) has been Ireland’s largest political party since 1932. Founded in 1926 by nationalist revolutionary Eamon de Valera, Fianna Fail broke away from the Sinn Fein party that had led the War for Independence in the years 1919 to 1921.1 That war had ended with a Treaty negotiated between the British government and representatives of Sinn Fein, a Treaty that divided republican opinion in Ireland.2 The pragmatist view stressed the gains made: Britain had made Ireland a coequal member of the British Commonwealth, with the same legislative and executive powers as Canada. The more radical section of Sinn Fein stressed what had been lost. For them, the Treaty represented a step back from the independent united republic declared in 1916, reaffirmed in 1919, and defended by force from 1919 to 1921. The difference in perception split the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the country, leading to a bitter, ten-month civil war.3 The pragmatists won the civil war, formed a new party, Cumann na nGaedhael (Party of the Irish) and governed the Irish Free State (now the Republic of Ireland) from 1922 to 1932. The losers in

Journal

Radical History ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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