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From National Capital to Global Capital: Urban Change in Mexico City

From National Capital to Global Capital: Urban Change in Mexico City 12(1): 207–213 Copyright © 2000 by Duke University Press modern Latin nation-states. Until well into the middle of the twentieth century, however, urban structures and life worlds in these cities were primarily conditioned by their roles as national centers of economics, politics, and culture. For Mexico City, even the physical geometry of its urban development remained unchanged, and this despite a population increase from 185,000 at the middle of the nineteenth century to over 3 million by the middle of the twentieth. Throughout this growth, the city retained the same quadrangular design set by Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century, and, until fifty years ago, the life of Mexico City was largely encompassed by this clearly delimited territory. The Centro Histórico, a district characterized by nineteenth-century colonial architecture and archaeological sites evocative of a prehispanic past, was the geographical, political, and cultural nucleus of this urban design; it remained Mexico City’s principal “reference at the symbolic and political level”— home to its “monumental and ultramodern Legislative Palace” and its national museums—until the 1980s (Monnet 1995, 14). During the period of the Centro Histórico’s prominence, the principal actor in national and urban life in Mexico was the state, occupied http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

From National Capital to Global Capital: Urban Change in Mexico City

Public Culture , Volume 12 (1) – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-12-1-207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

12(1): 207–213 Copyright © 2000 by Duke University Press modern Latin nation-states. Until well into the middle of the twentieth century, however, urban structures and life worlds in these cities were primarily conditioned by their roles as national centers of economics, politics, and culture. For Mexico City, even the physical geometry of its urban development remained unchanged, and this despite a population increase from 185,000 at the middle of the nineteenth century to over 3 million by the middle of the twentieth. Throughout this growth, the city retained the same quadrangular design set by Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century, and, until fifty years ago, the life of Mexico City was largely encompassed by this clearly delimited territory. The Centro Histórico, a district characterized by nineteenth-century colonial architecture and archaeological sites evocative of a prehispanic past, was the geographical, political, and cultural nucleus of this urban design; it remained Mexico City’s principal “reference at the symbolic and political level”— home to its “monumental and ultramodern Legislative Palace” and its national museums—until the 1980s (Monnet 1995, 14). During the period of the Centro Histórico’s prominence, the principal actor in national and urban life in Mexico was the state, occupied

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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