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Founders Chic As Culture War

Founders Chic As Culture War Page 185 (RE)VIEWS David Waldstreicher Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. New York: Knopf, 2000. Joanne B. Freeman, Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001. David McCullough, John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001. omething funny happened to the founding fathers on their way to the twenty-first century. Without a bi- or tricentennial in sight, they became, suddenly, newsworthy. “Founding Rivals: Startling New Research Shows Why America’s First Political Wars Were Far Worse Than Today’s,” proclaimed the headline of the February 26, 2001 issue of U.S. News and World Report. “More like squabbling brothers than ‘fathers,’ how did they succeed?” Despite the rivals’ tendency to attack each other, wrote Jay Tolson, “it was the human element that gave this peculiar politics its messy, improvised quality — and, in the end, made the founders’ achievement all the more remarkable.”1 Not to be outdone, Evan Thomas of Newsweek went even further a few months later, explaining that “Adams, Jefferson, Washington, and all the rest were the real thing, all right. They were an Even Greater Generation.”2 Recent bestsellers made it clear that “they cut political deals and stabbed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radical History Review Duke University Press

Founders Chic As Culture War

Radical History Review , Volume 2002 (84) – Oct 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc.
ISSN
0163-6545
eISSN
1534-1453
DOI
10.1215/01636545-2002-84-185
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 185 (RE)VIEWS David Waldstreicher Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. New York: Knopf, 2000. Joanne B. Freeman, Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001. David McCullough, John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001. omething funny happened to the founding fathers on their way to the twenty-first century. Without a bi- or tricentennial in sight, they became, suddenly, newsworthy. “Founding Rivals: Startling New Research Shows Why America’s First Political Wars Were Far Worse Than Today’s,” proclaimed the headline of the February 26, 2001 issue of U.S. News and World Report. “More like squabbling brothers than ‘fathers,’ how did they succeed?” Despite the rivals’ tendency to attack each other, wrote Jay Tolson, “it was the human element that gave this peculiar politics its messy, improvised quality — and, in the end, made the founders’ achievement all the more remarkable.”1 Not to be outdone, Evan Thomas of Newsweek went even further a few months later, explaining that “Adams, Jefferson, Washington, and all the rest were the real thing, all right. They were an Even Greater Generation.”2 Recent bestsellers made it clear that “they cut political deals and stabbed

Journal

Radical History ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2002

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