Forging the Tortilla Curtain: Cultural Drift and Change along the United States-Mexico Border from the Spanish Era to the Present

Forging the Tortilla Curtain: Cultural Drift and Change along the United States-Mexico Border... Hispanic American Historical Review 84:3 Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press the expectations and behavior of Europeans. Her study, then, minimizes Indian agency and thus occupies a peculiar place when considered next to recent scholarship on indigenous people, which tends to emphasize the complex processes of resistance and negotiation that ultimately shaped colonial configurations. Chronological elisions weaken Seed’s broad comparative study, as she collapses different periods and experiences into a single large unit. The English who sought profit in America read earlier Spanish accounts voraciously, especially those by José de Acosta and Bartolomé de Las Casas. To describe colonization efforts by these two different European kingdoms as if they happened simultaneously is to reject the ways in which English invasions and expectations were shaped by Spanish models. It also ignores the cultural contexts within which American incursions were conceived, whether in Renaissance Spain or early modern England. Seed deploys evidence in ways that might generate confusion about the chronological separation of events. The English, she argues, claimed land in the New World by virtue of cultivating it. She suggests that other Europeans dismissed these claims and cites Sepúlveda’s rejection of such justification as “ ‘mere theft’ ” ( http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic American Historical Review Duke University Press

Forging the Tortilla Curtain: Cultural Drift and Change along the United States-Mexico Border from the Spanish Era to the Present

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2168
eISSN
1527-1900
DOI
10.1215/00182168-84-3-568
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hispanic American Historical Review 84:3 Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press the expectations and behavior of Europeans. Her study, then, minimizes Indian agency and thus occupies a peculiar place when considered next to recent scholarship on indigenous people, which tends to emphasize the complex processes of resistance and negotiation that ultimately shaped colonial configurations. Chronological elisions weaken Seed’s broad comparative study, as she collapses different periods and experiences into a single large unit. The English who sought profit in America read earlier Spanish accounts voraciously, especially those by José de Acosta and Bartolomé de Las Casas. To describe colonization efforts by these two different European kingdoms as if they happened simultaneously is to reject the ways in which English invasions and expectations were shaped by Spanish models. It also ignores the cultural contexts within which American incursions were conceived, whether in Renaissance Spain or early modern England. Seed deploys evidence in ways that might generate confusion about the chronological separation of events. The English, she argues, claimed land in the New World by virtue of cultivating it. She suggests that other Europeans dismissed these claims and cites Sepúlveda’s rejection of such justification as “ ‘mere theft’ ” (

Journal

Hispanic American Historical ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2004

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