Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Feminisms in the Aftermath of September 11

Feminisms in the Aftermath of September 11 This essay is about how women’s rights as a complicated discourse, and Zillah Eisenstein the burkha as a complex symbolic, are the sites from which to understand the complexity of global power struggles at this moment. But first a note of context is necessary to clear some space for thinking — openly, criti- cally, historically — in terms of a before and after of September 11. Sep- tember 11 has not changed everything. It has just made clear how much context and perspective and location matter. Ask the people of Chile about September 11— when their beloved president, Salvador Allende, was gunned down in a coup d’état supported by the United States. Ask them the meaning of trauma and grief. Think back to the Gulf War and U.S. militarist terrorism of its smart bombs. Think across and beyond to the children of Iraq, today, this minute, who need cancer drugs or text- books for their schools and cannot have them because of the economic sanctions imposed on their country. Do what women always do — multi- task, so that you are not simply concentrated on yourself, or the United States, or this moment. Please remember: The U.S. economy was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Feminisms in the Aftermath of September 11

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/feminisms-in-the-aftermath-of-september-11-MMl81K2APW
Copyright
Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-20-3_72-79
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay is about how women’s rights as a complicated discourse, and Zillah Eisenstein the burkha as a complex symbolic, are the sites from which to understand the complexity of global power struggles at this moment. But first a note of context is necessary to clear some space for thinking — openly, criti- cally, historically — in terms of a before and after of September 11. Sep- tember 11 has not changed everything. It has just made clear how much context and perspective and location matter. Ask the people of Chile about September 11— when their beloved president, Salvador Allende, was gunned down in a coup d’état supported by the United States. Ask them the meaning of trauma and grief. Think back to the Gulf War and U.S. militarist terrorism of its smart bombs. Think across and beyond to the children of Iraq, today, this minute, who need cancer drugs or text- books for their schools and cannot have them because of the economic sanctions imposed on their country. Do what women always do — multi- task, so that you are not simply concentrated on yourself, or the United States, or this moment. Please remember: The U.S. economy was

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.