Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Engineering a New Order in the 1930s: The Case of Jean Coutrot

Engineering a New Order in the 1930s: The Case of Jean Coutrot Jackie Clarke is lecturer in French studies at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom. She is currently completing a book manuscript entitled Modernity and Crisis: Engineering a New France from the Great Depression to Vichy. Earlier versions of this article were presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies in Ottawa, March 1997, and at the History Research Seminar at the University of Cardiff, January 1999. The author wishes to thank all those who offered their comments on these occasions, particularly Joshua Cole, Judith Surkis, Karen Adler, Kevin Passmore, and Julian Jackson. 1 Herrick Chapman, ‘‘Modernity and National Identity in Postwar France,’’ French Historical Studies 22 (1999): 293. French Historical Studies, Vol. 24, No. 1 (winter 2001) Copyright © 2001 by the Society for French Historical Studies Tseng 2001.1.25 10:29 DST:103 6269 FRENCH HISTORICAL STUDIES 24:1 / sheet 68 of 159 FRENCH HISTORICAL STUDIES Bodies, is seduced by the myth of a postwar modernization that sprang from nowhere in the 1950s.2 Less surprisingly perhaps, Eugen Weber continues to operate within a conceptual framework that characterizes the 1930s as a period of generalized ‘‘Malthusianism.’’ 3 He also speaks of a ‘‘clash between engineers and humanists http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Historical Studies Duke University Press

Engineering a New Order in the 1930s: The Case of Jean Coutrot

French Historical Studies , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/engineering-a-new-order-in-the-1930s-the-case-of-jean-coutrot-NypFc89PZO
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Society for French Historical Studies
ISSN
0016-1071
eISSN
1527-5493
DOI
10.1215/00161071-24-1-63
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jackie Clarke is lecturer in French studies at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom. She is currently completing a book manuscript entitled Modernity and Crisis: Engineering a New France from the Great Depression to Vichy. Earlier versions of this article were presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies in Ottawa, March 1997, and at the History Research Seminar at the University of Cardiff, January 1999. The author wishes to thank all those who offered their comments on these occasions, particularly Joshua Cole, Judith Surkis, Karen Adler, Kevin Passmore, and Julian Jackson. 1 Herrick Chapman, ‘‘Modernity and National Identity in Postwar France,’’ French Historical Studies 22 (1999): 293. French Historical Studies, Vol. 24, No. 1 (winter 2001) Copyright © 2001 by the Society for French Historical Studies Tseng 2001.1.25 10:29 DST:103 6269 FRENCH HISTORICAL STUDIES 24:1 / sheet 68 of 159 FRENCH HISTORICAL STUDIES Bodies, is seduced by the myth of a postwar modernization that sprang from nowhere in the 1950s.2 Less surprisingly perhaps, Eugen Weber continues to operate within a conceptual framework that characterizes the 1930s as a period of generalized ‘‘Malthusianism.’’ 3 He also speaks of a ‘‘clash between engineers and humanists

Journal

French Historical StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.