Elizabeth Spencer, the White Civil Rights Novel, and the Postsouthern

Elizabeth Spencer, the White Civil Rights Novel, and the Postsouthern 1 Allen Tate, “The New Provincialism,” in Essays of Four Decades (Wilmington, DE: ISI, 1999), 546. Modern Language Quarterly 65:4 (December 2004): 561– 81. © 2004 University of Washington. MLQ December 2004 In “The New Provincialism” Tate argued that the renascence had been a product of the South’s long-delayed entry into modernity, an efflorescence dependent on the creative tension between traditional and modern values that the First World War had forced the region to recognize: “With the war of 1914 –1918, the South reentered the world — but gave a backward glance as it stepped over the border: that backward glance gave us the Southern renascence, a literature conscious of the past in the present” (545). Such fortuitous circumstances could not last, as Tate had predicted in “The Profession of Letters in the South”: “From the peculiarly historical consciousness of the Southern writer has come good work of a special order; but the focus of this consciousness is quite temporary. It has made possible the curious burst of intelligence that we get at a crossing of the ways, not unlike . . . the outburst of poetic genius at the end of the sixteenth century when commercial England http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History Duke University Press

Elizabeth Spencer, the White Civil Rights Novel, and the Postsouthern

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by University of Washington
ISSN
0026-7929
eISSN
1527-1943
D.O.I.
10.1215/00267929-65-4-561
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Allen Tate, “The New Provincialism,” in Essays of Four Decades (Wilmington, DE: ISI, 1999), 546. Modern Language Quarterly 65:4 (December 2004): 561– 81. © 2004 University of Washington. MLQ December 2004 In “The New Provincialism” Tate argued that the renascence had been a product of the South’s long-delayed entry into modernity, an efflorescence dependent on the creative tension between traditional and modern values that the First World War had forced the region to recognize: “With the war of 1914 –1918, the South reentered the world — but gave a backward glance as it stepped over the border: that backward glance gave us the Southern renascence, a literature conscious of the past in the present” (545). Such fortuitous circumstances could not last, as Tate had predicted in “The Profession of Letters in the South”: “From the peculiarly historical consciousness of the Southern writer has come good work of a special order; but the focus of this consciousness is quite temporary. It has made possible the curious burst of intelligence that we get at a crossing of the ways, not unlike . . . the outburst of poetic genius at the end of the sixteenth century when commercial England

Journal

Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary HistoryDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2004

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