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Editors' IntroductionShared Governance and the “Wisconsin” Moment

Editors' IntroductionShared Governance and the “Wisconsin” Moment Editors’ Introduction Shared Governance and the “Wisconsin” Moment Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor We need to understand that a history of faculty governance includes this history of contention, that a history of civic institutions is incomplete without this history of immoderate struggle. We’re in a rhetorically topsy- turvy moment in which public programs and jobs are cut in the name of egalitarianism, in which universities defund undergraduate and especially liberal arts education in the name of academic excellence, and in which we are enjoined for the sake of civility to hold our tongues while actual space for civil discourse and civic decision m - aking contracts. — Nancy Welch, “La Langue de Coton: How Neoliberal Rhetoric Pulls the Wool over Faculty Governance” As this issue goes to press, the news is pretty bleak for public employees in the Midwest. All one has to say is “Wisconsin” and most readers will see images of hundreds of thousands of protestors unsuccessfully demonstrating to keep Governor Scott Walker and the Republican- controlled Wisconsin legislature from passing the Budget Repair Bill that strips most public employee unions of the right to collective bargaining (and doesn’t appear to have much to do with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

Editors' IntroductionShared Governance and the “Wisconsin” Moment

Pedagogy , Volume 11 (3) – Oct 1, 2011

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References (11)

Copyright
© 2011 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-1302705
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editors’ Introduction Shared Governance and the “Wisconsin” Moment Jennifer L. Holberg and Marcy Taylor We need to understand that a history of faculty governance includes this history of contention, that a history of civic institutions is incomplete without this history of immoderate struggle. We’re in a rhetorically topsy- turvy moment in which public programs and jobs are cut in the name of egalitarianism, in which universities defund undergraduate and especially liberal arts education in the name of academic excellence, and in which we are enjoined for the sake of civility to hold our tongues while actual space for civil discourse and civic decision m - aking contracts. — Nancy Welch, “La Langue de Coton: How Neoliberal Rhetoric Pulls the Wool over Faculty Governance” As this issue goes to press, the news is pretty bleak for public employees in the Midwest. All one has to say is “Wisconsin” and most readers will see images of hundreds of thousands of protestors unsuccessfully demonstrating to keep Governor Scott Walker and the Republican- controlled Wisconsin legislature from passing the Budget Repair Bill that strips most public employee unions of the right to collective bargaining (and doesn’t appear to have much to do with

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2011

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