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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction Winter 2001 Kong cinema as a whole. Instead, Yau utilizes Deleuze’s typing of cinematic time-images to analyze the different mixtures of the indiscernible, the actual, and the possible in Wong Kar-wai’s Center Stage, of spectral recollection in Stanley Kwan’s Rouge, and of falsifying memories in Ann Hui’s Song of the Exile. These works are not mere imitation or repetition of the West, but new possibilities in another place, another time. Yau agrees with Deleuze that nationality, authorship, genres, canons, and stylistics are not abstract problematics but are realized by the workings of history, geography, and representation. Christian de Pee’s “Premodern Chinese Weddings and the Divorce of Past and Present” is a historiography of the study of the Chinese wedding. De Pee argues that the assumption of universal linear development underlies much of modern scholarship on China. To emphasize the modernity, which is to say the progress, of the Chinese nation-state, historical narrative traces a continuous development from the past to the present, whether the topic be wedding, family, woman, individual, or nation. By reading into texts what we expect to get out of them, we project a development leading to the present. To get at Chinese “pasts,” contemporary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Editor's Introduction

positions asia critique , Volume 9 (3) – Dec 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-9-3-497
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Winter 2001 Kong cinema as a whole. Instead, Yau utilizes Deleuze’s typing of cinematic time-images to analyze the different mixtures of the indiscernible, the actual, and the possible in Wong Kar-wai’s Center Stage, of spectral recollection in Stanley Kwan’s Rouge, and of falsifying memories in Ann Hui’s Song of the Exile. These works are not mere imitation or repetition of the West, but new possibilities in another place, another time. Yau agrees with Deleuze that nationality, authorship, genres, canons, and stylistics are not abstract problematics but are realized by the workings of history, geography, and representation. Christian de Pee’s “Premodern Chinese Weddings and the Divorce of Past and Present” is a historiography of the study of the Chinese wedding. De Pee argues that the assumption of universal linear development underlies much of modern scholarship on China. To emphasize the modernity, which is to say the progress, of the Chinese nation-state, historical narrative traces a continuous development from the past to the present, whether the topic be wedding, family, woman, individual, or nation. By reading into texts what we expect to get out of them, we project a development leading to the present. To get at Chinese “pasts,” contemporary

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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