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Economics and Interdisciplinary Exchange

Economics and Interdisciplinary Exchange Economics and Interdisciplinary Exchange. Edited by Guido Erreygers. London: Routledge, 2001. 214 pp. $90.00. This is a very fine volume of papers, the by-product of one of the annual European Conferences on the History of Economics, held in Antwerp in 1998. It is unlikely that individual scholars will purchase this book because of the price, but certainly the articles will be of considerable service to the scholarly community and I urge you to read them. The conference sought to provide some counterweight to Gary Becker’s economic imperialism, whereby virtually all behavioral phenomena are rendered in terms of utility maximization. Some of the papers are more clearly directed against Becker’s movement than others, but all of them help to show the ways in which the boundaries of economics are permeable, whether to other sciences, to ethics and religion, or to political and professional agendas. In short, the channels run both ways, at least for economic thinking of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Bruna Ingrao’s paper is in many respects the most original and profound of the group. She addresses the variety of economic ideas found in fiction of the nineteenth century, and the range is impressive: Gogol, Stendhal, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Economics and Interdisciplinary Exchange

History of Political Economy , Volume 35 (3) – Sep 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-35-3-602
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Economics and Interdisciplinary Exchange. Edited by Guido Erreygers. London: Routledge, 2001. 214 pp. $90.00. This is a very fine volume of papers, the by-product of one of the annual European Conferences on the History of Economics, held in Antwerp in 1998. It is unlikely that individual scholars will purchase this book because of the price, but certainly the articles will be of considerable service to the scholarly community and I urge you to read them. The conference sought to provide some counterweight to Gary Becker’s economic imperialism, whereby virtually all behavioral phenomena are rendered in terms of utility maximization. Some of the papers are more clearly directed against Becker’s movement than others, but all of them help to show the ways in which the boundaries of economics are permeable, whether to other sciences, to ethics and religion, or to political and professional agendas. In short, the channels run both ways, at least for economic thinking of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Bruna Ingrao’s paper is in many respects the most original and profound of the group. She addresses the variety of economic ideas found in fiction of the nineteenth century, and the range is impressive: Gogol, Stendhal,

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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