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DO NATIVE SPEAKERS KNOW WHAT WORDS MEAN?

DO NATIVE SPEAKERS KNOW WHAT WORDS MEAN? American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 3, Fall 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society american speech 77.3 (2002) a national radio network program which argued that the “new millennium” would begin with the year 2000. A statement to this effect, however, does not establish this as a fact for the writer of this letter, as he went on to offer an argument for his position which in fact contradicted his statement. He argued that reaching the new millennium was parallel to reaching the century mark in cricket. However, a century is not achieved until the hundredth run is completed, and the next run starts the batsman on his way to his next century. Following this logic, the completion of year 2000 marks the end of the millennium, and the following year the beginning of the next. For the writer of the letter, either his claim that the new millennium begins in 2000 or his argument is in error. Although meaning is internalized (i.e., exists in the brain and not as some entity in the outside world), it is not accessible to us in the same way as recalling an experience is—we cannot visualize with our mind’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

DO NATIVE SPEAKERS KNOW WHAT WORDS MEAN?

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-77-3-325
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 3, Fall 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society american speech 77.3 (2002) a national radio network program which argued that the “new millennium” would begin with the year 2000. A statement to this effect, however, does not establish this as a fact for the writer of this letter, as he went on to offer an argument for his position which in fact contradicted his statement. He argued that reaching the new millennium was parallel to reaching the century mark in cricket. However, a century is not achieved until the hundredth run is completed, and the next run starts the batsman on his way to his next century. Following this logic, the completion of year 2000 marks the end of the millennium, and the following year the beginning of the next. For the writer of the letter, either his claim that the new millennium begins in 2000 or his argument is in error. Although meaning is internalized (i.e., exists in the brain and not as some entity in the outside world), it is not accessible to us in the same way as recalling an experience is—we cannot visualize with our mind’s

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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