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Deep Democracy: Urban Governmentality and the Horizon of Politics

Deep Democracy: Urban Governmentality and the Horizon of Politics ost-1989, the world seems marked by the global victory of some version of neoliberalism, backed by the ubiquitous presence of the United States and sustained by the common openness to market processes of regimes otherwise varied in their political, religious, and historical traditions. At the same time, more than a decade after the fall of the Soviet order, it is clearer than ever that global inequality has widened, intranational warfare has vastly outpaced international This essay is based on research funded by the Ford Foundation. I owe special thanks to Carol A. Breckenridge, who first suggested to me that the work of the Mumbai Alliance could be characterized in the image of “deep democracy.” The first draft of this essay was written in June 2000 at the University of Amsterdam’s School of Social Science Research, where I was honored to serve as a Distinguished Visiting Professor. Since then, it has been debated by audiences in Chicago, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and Paris. For their useful criticism and help in organizing these discussions, I must thank Marc Abélès, Hugo Achugar, Irene Belier, Partha Chatterjee, Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar, Christophe Jaffrelot, Elizabeth Jelin, Benjamin Lee, Achille Mbembe, Mariella Pandolfi, Charles Taylor, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Deep Democracy: Urban Governmentality and the Horizon of Politics

Public Culture , Volume 14 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-14-1-21
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ost-1989, the world seems marked by the global victory of some version of neoliberalism, backed by the ubiquitous presence of the United States and sustained by the common openness to market processes of regimes otherwise varied in their political, religious, and historical traditions. At the same time, more than a decade after the fall of the Soviet order, it is clearer than ever that global inequality has widened, intranational warfare has vastly outpaced international This essay is based on research funded by the Ford Foundation. I owe special thanks to Carol A. Breckenridge, who first suggested to me that the work of the Mumbai Alliance could be characterized in the image of “deep democracy.” The first draft of this essay was written in June 2000 at the University of Amsterdam’s School of Social Science Research, where I was honored to serve as a Distinguished Visiting Professor. Since then, it has been debated by audiences in Chicago, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and Paris. For their useful criticism and help in organizing these discussions, I must thank Marc Abélès, Hugo Achugar, Irene Belier, Partha Chatterjee, Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar, Christophe Jaffrelot, Elizabeth Jelin, Benjamin Lee, Achille Mbembe, Mariella Pandolfi, Charles Taylor, and

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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