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Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution: Mob Justice and Police in Petrograd by Tsuyoshi Hasegawa

Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution: Mob Justice and Police in Petrograd by Tsuyoshi... B o o k R e v i e w s        181 Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution: Mob Justice and Police in Petrograd Tsuyoshi Hasegawa Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, xi +  pp., $. (cloth) Since  itself, Russia’s year of revolutions has been regarded and represented as an annus mirabilis or annus horribilis, depending on one’s viewpoint, with few variations in between. This study aspires to a portrait, from the bottom up, of this state and society in extremis. Rather than focus on high politics or ideology, the author, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, is more interested in the day-to-day tribulations resulting from this war-torn state’s cha- otic transition from tsarist regime to two quite different revolutionary regimes. The rst, in February, saw a battle of competing class interests that largely helped defer the rev- olutionary future, while the second, in October, saw the rise of a radically Manichaean polity of more urgent intent. How, this work asks, do a state and a society in chaos react to that crisis over time? What social and political forms does the chaos take? How does a self-professed revolutionary state, its rationale predicated upon popular liberation from former repressions, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labor Duke University Press

Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution: Mob Justice and Police in Petrograd by Tsuyoshi Hasegawa

Labor , Volume 16 (1) – Mar 1, 2019

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Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Labor and Working-Class History Association
ISSN
1547-6715
eISSN
1558-1454
DOI
10.1215/15476715-7269434
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

B o o k R e v i e w s        181 Crime and Punishment in the Russian Revolution: Mob Justice and Police in Petrograd Tsuyoshi Hasegawa Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, xi +  pp., $. (cloth) Since  itself, Russia’s year of revolutions has been regarded and represented as an annus mirabilis or annus horribilis, depending on one’s viewpoint, with few variations in between. This study aspires to a portrait, from the bottom up, of this state and society in extremis. Rather than focus on high politics or ideology, the author, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, is more interested in the day-to-day tribulations resulting from this war-torn state’s cha- otic transition from tsarist regime to two quite different revolutionary regimes. The rst, in February, saw a battle of competing class interests that largely helped defer the rev- olutionary future, while the second, in October, saw the rise of a radically Manichaean polity of more urgent intent. How, this work asks, do a state and a society in chaos react to that crisis over time? What social and political forms does the chaos take? How does a self-professed revolutionary state, its rationale predicated upon popular liberation from former repressions,

Journal

LaborDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2019

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