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Convergence of the Two Cultures: A Geek's Guide to Contemporary Literature

Convergence of the Two Cultures: A Geek's Guide to Contemporary Literature American Literature studios, from open-source mavericks to corporate Web designers, the freedom to range across diverse zones of interest and inquiry is a major source of creativity. To be passionate about technology, traditional culture, and pop culture all at once is less rare than many realize. ‘‘Journalists, educators, and pundits frequently fuss that kids like Jesse don’t read or aren’t well informed; in fact, they read enormous amounts of material online, and are astonishingly well informed about subjects they’re interested in’’ (G, 41). If most of this cultural life takes place on-line, the single cultural exception [is] books. Perhaps as a legacy of his childhood, Jesse remained an obsessive reader. He liked digging through the bins of used bookstores to buy sci-fi and classic literature; he liked books, holding them and turning their pages. (G, 42) As a result, this teenager ‘‘was almost shockingly bright’’ (G, 10)— his notion of culture mixed philosophy, films, literature, music, technology, and politics. For Jesse, and the computer pioneers who helped produce the Internet boom of the 1990s, the idea of separating technology from other domains of culture made little sense. This essay will explore a group of writers who have also http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literature Duke University Press

Convergence of the Two Cultures: A Geek's Guide to Contemporary Literature

American Literature , Volume 74 (4) – Dec 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0002-9831
eISSN
1527-2117
DOI
10.1215/00029831-74-4-807
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Literature studios, from open-source mavericks to corporate Web designers, the freedom to range across diverse zones of interest and inquiry is a major source of creativity. To be passionate about technology, traditional culture, and pop culture all at once is less rare than many realize. ‘‘Journalists, educators, and pundits frequently fuss that kids like Jesse don’t read or aren’t well informed; in fact, they read enormous amounts of material online, and are astonishingly well informed about subjects they’re interested in’’ (G, 41). If most of this cultural life takes place on-line, the single cultural exception [is] books. Perhaps as a legacy of his childhood, Jesse remained an obsessive reader. He liked digging through the bins of used bookstores to buy sci-fi and classic literature; he liked books, holding them and turning their pages. (G, 42) As a result, this teenager ‘‘was almost shockingly bright’’ (G, 10)— his notion of culture mixed philosophy, films, literature, music, technology, and politics. For Jesse, and the computer pioneers who helped produce the Internet boom of the 1990s, the idea of separating technology from other domains of culture made little sense. This essay will explore a group of writers who have also

Journal

American LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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