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Connected Disconnection and Localized Globalism in Pacific Multilingual Literature

Connected Disconnection and Localized Globalism in Pacific Multilingual Literature Special thanks to Cynthia Franklin, Susan Schultz, Charles Weigl, and the two readers assigned by boundary 2 for extensive help with various rewrites. All errors are, of course, my own. boundary 2 31:3, 2004. Copyright © 2004 by Duke University Press. 76 boundary 2 / Fall 2004 Islands,’’ there is a Pacific of disconnection and a Pacific of connection. The difference lies in seeing Pacific geography and culture as, in Hau ofa’s words, ‘‘islands in a far sea’’ (tiny dots of land separated by wide expanses of ocean) or seeing it as ‘‘a sea of islands’’ (tiny dots joined by an ocean). The second model, one of hope, sees travel, trade, and migration as prominent parts of Pacific life, a life of movement, canoes, and jets.1 The literature of the Pacific is about both Pacifics. Like Hau ofa, I am more interested in connection. I am especially interested in literature that argues forcefully for local concerns as an important part of, even if often resistant to, global systems. Yet, whenever I read the literature of Hawai i’s multivalenced and multicultural traditions, I see embedded within its inclusions numerous moments of separation and disjunction in which boundaries or limits http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture Duke University Press

Connected Disconnection and Localized Globalism in Pacific Multilingual Literature

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0190-3659
eISSN
1527-2141
DOI
10.1215/01903659-31-3-75
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Special thanks to Cynthia Franklin, Susan Schultz, Charles Weigl, and the two readers assigned by boundary 2 for extensive help with various rewrites. All errors are, of course, my own. boundary 2 31:3, 2004. Copyright © 2004 by Duke University Press. 76 boundary 2 / Fall 2004 Islands,’’ there is a Pacific of disconnection and a Pacific of connection. The difference lies in seeing Pacific geography and culture as, in Hau ofa’s words, ‘‘islands in a far sea’’ (tiny dots of land separated by wide expanses of ocean) or seeing it as ‘‘a sea of islands’’ (tiny dots joined by an ocean). The second model, one of hope, sees travel, trade, and migration as prominent parts of Pacific life, a life of movement, canoes, and jets.1 The literature of the Pacific is about both Pacifics. Like Hau ofa, I am more interested in connection. I am especially interested in literature that argues forcefully for local concerns as an important part of, even if often resistant to, global systems. Yet, whenever I read the literature of Hawai i’s multivalenced and multicultural traditions, I see embedded within its inclusions numerous moments of separation and disjunction in which boundaries or limits

Journal

boundary 2: an international journal of literature and cultureDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2004

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