Computing: What's American Literary Study Got to Do with IT?

Computing: What's American Literary Study Got to Do with IT? American Literature staring at my computer screen, I thought about what they were likely to say as well as how my colleagues throughout the English department and the College of Arts and Humanities generally responded to digital studies, new media productions, cyberculture studies, and the complex markup schemes of computing devised specifically for literary texts, all of which had come to shape the routines of my scholarly life during the last half decade of the twentieth century. My office at the time had a glass wall overlooking the Reserves Room in the main research library. At that moment, Reserves was packed, each student working separately in an individual study carrel. I mused upon my colleagues’ response to humanities computing as I peered down into a quiet room full of scholars working separately in the traditions of the individual talent. In response to my excitement about this brave new world of electronic text encoding, digital imaging, digital sound reproduction, and transmission of all of these via the World Wide Web, DVD, or CD-ROM, colleagues would often insist that digital studies has no relevance to their own areas of literary critical inquiry. And I would continually puzzle over this resistance http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literature Duke University Press

Computing: What's American Literary Study Got to Do with IT?

American Literature, Volume 74 (4) – Dec 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0002-9831
eISSN
1527-2117
DOI
10.1215/00029831-74-4-833
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Literature staring at my computer screen, I thought about what they were likely to say as well as how my colleagues throughout the English department and the College of Arts and Humanities generally responded to digital studies, new media productions, cyberculture studies, and the complex markup schemes of computing devised specifically for literary texts, all of which had come to shape the routines of my scholarly life during the last half decade of the twentieth century. My office at the time had a glass wall overlooking the Reserves Room in the main research library. At that moment, Reserves was packed, each student working separately in an individual study carrel. I mused upon my colleagues’ response to humanities computing as I peered down into a quiet room full of scholars working separately in the traditions of the individual talent. In response to my excitement about this brave new world of electronic text encoding, digital imaging, digital sound reproduction, and transmission of all of these via the World Wide Web, DVD, or CD-ROM, colleagues would often insist that digital studies has no relevance to their own areas of literary critical inquiry. And I would continually puzzle over this resistance

Journal

American LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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