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Citizenship, Inheritance, and the Indigenizing of "Orang Chinese" in Indonesia

Citizenship, Inheritance, and the Indigenizing of "Orang Chinese" in Indonesia positions 9:3 Winter 2001 Continuities amid Ruptures The conflagration and sexual violence that occurred in Jakarta on 13 and 14 May 1998, part of a train of events that culminated in the resignation of President Suharto on the twenty-first of the same month, were widely believed to have been instigated by certain state, particularly military, officials.1 Most controversial were the rapes of scores of Chinese women, which some pribumi (indigenous) Indonesians would dispute as untrue but which galvanized overseas Chinese in several countries to mount street demonstrations. The rapes signified, in Ariel Heryanto’s view, a “spectacular public display of violence directed against sanctified sites and rules of sexuality,” with media reports and public discourse about these events resulting in their “racialization” and the reproduction of “externally imposed stigmas.”2 Confirmed by the official Joint Fact-Finding Team, the involvement by statist provocateurs signaled the known and familiar world of state violence.3 The certainty of an identifiable cause behind the troubles provided a sense of predictability in a time of social upheaval. The manipulation of the crowds by high authorities was a source of reassurance, particularly for the pribumi middle classes, that no matter how violent the situation, the “masses” would http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Citizenship, Inheritance, and the Indigenizing of "Orang Chinese" in Indonesia

positions asia critique , Volume 9 (3) – Dec 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-9-3-501
Publisher site
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Abstract

positions 9:3 Winter 2001 Continuities amid Ruptures The conflagration and sexual violence that occurred in Jakarta on 13 and 14 May 1998, part of a train of events that culminated in the resignation of President Suharto on the twenty-first of the same month, were widely believed to have been instigated by certain state, particularly military, officials.1 Most controversial were the rapes of scores of Chinese women, which some pribumi (indigenous) Indonesians would dispute as untrue but which galvanized overseas Chinese in several countries to mount street demonstrations. The rapes signified, in Ariel Heryanto’s view, a “spectacular public display of violence directed against sanctified sites and rules of sexuality,” with media reports and public discourse about these events resulting in their “racialization” and the reproduction of “externally imposed stigmas.”2 Confirmed by the official Joint Fact-Finding Team, the involvement by statist provocateurs signaled the known and familiar world of state violence.3 The certainty of an identifiable cause behind the troubles provided a sense of predictability in a time of social upheaval. The manipulation of the crowds by high authorities was a source of reassurance, particularly for the pribumi middle classes, that no matter how violent the situation, the “masses” would

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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