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CITIES, QUEER SPACE, AND THE COSMOPOLITAN TOURIST

CITIES, QUEER SPACE, AND THE COSMOPOLITAN TOURIST GLQ: A JOURNAL OF LESBIAN AND GAY STUDIES In this instance, racial diversity and sexual diversity highlight the establishment’s sophisticated allure even as nonwhite and/or queer bodies provide a chic stamp of approval recognized by the reader of the New York Times, assumed to be a cosmopolitan traveler. Although Cohen does not preclude the possibility of queers of color in his description of the nightclub, Asian and African are offered as other, presumably in opposition to whiteness, and homosexual is offered as the other of heterosexual. If bodies are assumed to be heterosexual and white unless otherwise specified, only one axis of difference is presumed, and queers of color are erased from the discourses of cosmopolitanism and globalization, as consumers and commodities. In clubs such as the Greenwich, queers and queer space are consumed by a broader, non-queer-identified public in ways that shape the evolution of these spaces and affect the everyday lives of the gays who inhabit them (whether as residents or as tourists themselves).4 Whether local residents or visitors to the city, empathetic supporters or scandalized voyeurs, tourists read as straight consume the temporary space of queer festivals and parades or the more enduring spaces of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

CITIES, QUEER SPACE, AND THE COSMOPOLITAN TOURIST

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1527-9375
DOI
10.1215/10642684-8-1-2-183
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

GLQ: A JOURNAL OF LESBIAN AND GAY STUDIES In this instance, racial diversity and sexual diversity highlight the establishment’s sophisticated allure even as nonwhite and/or queer bodies provide a chic stamp of approval recognized by the reader of the New York Times, assumed to be a cosmopolitan traveler. Although Cohen does not preclude the possibility of queers of color in his description of the nightclub, Asian and African are offered as other, presumably in opposition to whiteness, and homosexual is offered as the other of heterosexual. If bodies are assumed to be heterosexual and white unless otherwise specified, only one axis of difference is presumed, and queers of color are erased from the discourses of cosmopolitanism and globalization, as consumers and commodities. In clubs such as the Greenwich, queers and queer space are consumed by a broader, non-queer-identified public in ways that shape the evolution of these spaces and affect the everyday lives of the gays who inhabit them (whether as residents or as tourists themselves).4 Whether local residents or visitors to the city, empathetic supporters or scandalized voyeurs, tourists read as straight consume the temporary space of queer festivals and parades or the more enduring spaces of

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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