Cinema Frames, Videoscapes, and Cyberspace: Exploring Shu Lea Cheang's Fresh Kill

Cinema Frames, Videoscapes, and Cyberspace: Exploring Shu Lea Cheang's Fresh Kill positions 9:2 Fall 2001 the fiction feature film dissipates centrifugally and evolves into video art and hypertextual cyberspace, following a performance/installation/televisual aesthetic, the seemingly scattered references to toxic waste, ethnic tourism, homophobia, and colonialism, among many other issues, merge with a centripetal force that defies linear reasoning. Fresh Kill is not just a radical call for environmentalism, anticapitalism, anti-imperialism, gay/lesbian rights, feminism, and radical multiculturalism. Its main claim for critical attention comes from the way it envisions the combination of dialectical thinking, new technologies, and media activism as a primer for the radical communications community. Fresh Kill’s title refers to a fictitious landfill that dominates Staten Island. Junk rules many of the film’s compositions, and, thematically, the film revolves around the detritus of an urban consumer society in which transnational corporations bring raw materials from the Third World— contaminating goods and people in the process—and dump them in the borough. Fresh Kill makes sense out of this refuse by exploring connections among people on the edges of corporate capitalism and off-center in a white, bourgeois, heterosexual world. From the beaches of Taiwan’s Orchid Island, used as a nuclear waste site in the 1980s, to the shores of New http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Cinema Frames, Videoscapes, and Cyberspace: Exploring Shu Lea Cheang's Fresh Kill

positions asia critique, Volume 9 (2) – Sep 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
D.O.I.
10.1215/10679847-9-2-401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 9:2 Fall 2001 the fiction feature film dissipates centrifugally and evolves into video art and hypertextual cyberspace, following a performance/installation/televisual aesthetic, the seemingly scattered references to toxic waste, ethnic tourism, homophobia, and colonialism, among many other issues, merge with a centripetal force that defies linear reasoning. Fresh Kill is not just a radical call for environmentalism, anticapitalism, anti-imperialism, gay/lesbian rights, feminism, and radical multiculturalism. Its main claim for critical attention comes from the way it envisions the combination of dialectical thinking, new technologies, and media activism as a primer for the radical communications community. Fresh Kill’s title refers to a fictitious landfill that dominates Staten Island. Junk rules many of the film’s compositions, and, thematically, the film revolves around the detritus of an urban consumer society in which transnational corporations bring raw materials from the Third World— contaminating goods and people in the process—and dump them in the borough. Fresh Kill makes sense out of this refuse by exploring connections among people on the edges of corporate capitalism and off-center in a white, bourgeois, heterosexual world. From the beaches of Taiwan’s Orchid Island, used as a nuclear waste site in the 1980s, to the shores of New

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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