Child Labor in Sub-Saharan Africa

Child Labor in Sub-Saharan Africa less of country. The second looks at the curious case of Haiti—curious because it is almost unique in its mostly private school system and, despite its recurrent political instability, because its urban enrollment rate is extremely high. It has also shown a long and steady history of educational innovation. The case of Kenya shows that a country’s educational system is subject to the impact of powerful global forces. Fredrick M. Nafukho, Winston Jumba Akala, and John K. Rugutt show that Kenya’s deteriorating teaching quality and enrollments are attributable to the demands of structural adjustment loans from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Part of the problem has been the application of a cookie-cutter model when much more culturally specific models are called for. In the final chapter Temba Bassoppo-Moyo and Vivien Mweene Chabalengula examine one of the more recent and technologically advanced reforms: distance education. Using South Africa as a case study, they conclude that distance education has clear advantages, such as increasing accessibility of education, but it has not yet gained the respect and acceptance of students, teachers, and administrators. Perhaps it is a good idea whose time has not yet come. One of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/child-labor-in-sub-saharan-africa-yAG1yy8zUC
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2006 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1089-201X
D.O.I.
10.1215/1089201x-2005-018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

less of country. The second looks at the curious case of Haiti—curious because it is almost unique in its mostly private school system and, despite its recurrent political instability, because its urban enrollment rate is extremely high. It has also shown a long and steady history of educational innovation. The case of Kenya shows that a country’s educational system is subject to the impact of powerful global forces. Fredrick M. Nafukho, Winston Jumba Akala, and John K. Rugutt show that Kenya’s deteriorating teaching quality and enrollments are attributable to the demands of structural adjustment loans from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Part of the problem has been the application of a cookie-cutter model when much more culturally specific models are called for. In the final chapter Temba Bassoppo-Moyo and Vivien Mweene Chabalengula examine one of the more recent and technologically advanced reforms: distance education. Using South Africa as a case study, they conclude that distance education has clear advantages, such as increasing accessibility of education, but it has not yet gained the respect and acceptance of students, teachers, and administrators. Perhaps it is a good idea whose time has not yet come. One of the

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off