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Bodin's Analysis of Inflation

Bodin's Analysis of Inflation Page 267 Bodin’s Analysis of Inflation Denis P. O’Brien The work of Jean Bodin (1530 – 1596) has been known to economists at least since the mid-nineteenth century (McCulloch [1862] 1995, 37), even though his wider fame, by far, lies in political philosophy. But there has been disagreement over precisely what Bodin achieved in his writings on economics.1 There is no disputing that the interest of his economic writing lies chiefly in his analysis of the causes of the inflation that was affecting France at the time that he published the two editions of his Response to Malestroit (1568 and 1578). But there is considerable dispute about the nature of his achievement. On one hand, we have J. A. Schumpeter Correspondence may be addressed to Denis P. O’Brien, c/o Department of Economics, University of Durham, Durham DH1, 3HY, U.K. This reconsideration of Bodin’s work has been inspired by the new translation of his Response to the Paradoxes of Malestroit ([1568/1578] 1997) by the late Henry Tudor and Dr. R. W. Dyson. This translation is unique in its incorporation of the texts of both the 1568 and 1578 editions of Bodin’s Response. I am grateful to Professor John Creedy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Bodin's Analysis of Inflation

History of Political Economy , Volume 32 (2) – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-32-2-267
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 267 Bodin’s Analysis of Inflation Denis P. O’Brien The work of Jean Bodin (1530 – 1596) has been known to economists at least since the mid-nineteenth century (McCulloch [1862] 1995, 37), even though his wider fame, by far, lies in political philosophy. But there has been disagreement over precisely what Bodin achieved in his writings on economics.1 There is no disputing that the interest of his economic writing lies chiefly in his analysis of the causes of the inflation that was affecting France at the time that he published the two editions of his Response to Malestroit (1568 and 1578). But there is considerable dispute about the nature of his achievement. On one hand, we have J. A. Schumpeter Correspondence may be addressed to Denis P. O’Brien, c/o Department of Economics, University of Durham, Durham DH1, 3HY, U.K. This reconsideration of Bodin’s work has been inspired by the new translation of his Response to the Paradoxes of Malestroit ([1568/1578] 1997) by the late Henry Tudor and Dr. R. W. Dyson. This translation is unique in its incorporation of the texts of both the 1568 and 1578 editions of Bodin’s Response. I am grateful to Professor John Creedy

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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