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Biocommunicability: THE NEOLIBERAL SUBJECT AND ITS CONTRADICTIONS IN NEWS COVERAGE OF HEALTH ISSUES

Biocommunicability: THE NEOLIBERAL SUBJECT AND ITS CONTRADICTIONS IN NEWS COVERAGE OF HEALTH ISSUES Charles L. Briggs and Daniel C. Hallin How does one inhabit the mediated body? Biopolitics and biosociality form crucial loci for exploring contemporary subjectivities, rationalities, technologies, forms of embodiment, forms of care for the “self,” and schemes of self-surveillance and self-regulation.1 Recent scholarship suggests that biopolitics and citizenship are co-constitutive: constructions of citizenship and how individuals and populations get interpellated by them shape access to health and vice versa.2 Sanitary citizenship — the ways that states read bodies and bodily practices and assess the biomedical knowledge of individuals and populations — constitutes an increasingly important site for regulating and rationalizing access to privileges of citizenship.3 Becoming a “carrier” of an infectious disease or getting designated as being “at risk” provides a sign of biopolitical pathology. Diseases that have been connected with inequality and citizenship for two centuries, such as cholera and tuberculosis, now take their place as “reemerging” maladies alongside “emerging” diseases like HIV/AIDS and “Asian bird flu.”4 Displacement of organs from poor to rich, bodies of color to white, is promoting a transnational regime of biovalue as well as transforming definitions of body, self, life, and death.5 Participation in clinical trials and access to pharmaceuticals — and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Biocommunicability: THE NEOLIBERAL SUBJECT AND ITS CONTRADICTIONS IN NEWS COVERAGE OF HEALTH ISSUES

Social Text , Volume 25 (4 93) – Dec 1, 2007

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-2007-011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Charles L. Briggs and Daniel C. Hallin How does one inhabit the mediated body? Biopolitics and biosociality form crucial loci for exploring contemporary subjectivities, rationalities, technologies, forms of embodiment, forms of care for the “self,” and schemes of self-surveillance and self-regulation.1 Recent scholarship suggests that biopolitics and citizenship are co-constitutive: constructions of citizenship and how individuals and populations get interpellated by them shape access to health and vice versa.2 Sanitary citizenship — the ways that states read bodies and bodily practices and assess the biomedical knowledge of individuals and populations — constitutes an increasingly important site for regulating and rationalizing access to privileges of citizenship.3 Becoming a “carrier” of an infectious disease or getting designated as being “at risk” provides a sign of biopolitical pathology. Diseases that have been connected with inequality and citizenship for two centuries, such as cholera and tuberculosis, now take their place as “reemerging” maladies alongside “emerging” diseases like HIV/AIDS and “Asian bird flu.”4 Displacement of organs from poor to rich, bodies of color to white, is promoting a transnational regime of biovalue as well as transforming definitions of body, self, life, and death.5 Participation in clinical trials and access to pharmaceuticals — and

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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