Beyond Resistance: Notes Toward a New Caribbean Cultural Studies

Beyond Resistance: Notes Toward a New Caribbean Cultural Studies 1. Peter Wilson, Crab Antics: The Social Anthropology of English-Speaking Negro Societies of the Caribbean (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1973). 2. Gloss taken from Richard D. E. Burton, Afro-Creole: Power, Opposition, and Play in the Caribbean (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997), 162. For an overview of the impact of Wilson’s study on Caribbean anthropology, see Daniel Miller, Modernity: An Ethnographic Approach: Dualism and Mass Consumption in Trinidad (Oxford: Berg, 1994), 259–64. Small Axe 14, September 2003: pp. 23–38 ISSN 0799-0537 I submit that in recent years Caribbean cultural studies has emphasized and celebrated the antisystemic values of reputation to the exclusion of respectability. This is most obvious in the disproportionate study of carnival as compared to Christmas (an small imbalance that Daniel Miller has observed). Moreover, the privileging of reputation axe in Caribbean studies is continuous with a fetishization of resistance and transgression in cultural studies more broadly.³ In both cases, the fascination with resistance and transgression derives from a legitimate critique of statism and class reductionism, and an interest in the political possibilities they neglect—whether feminism and the New Social Movements, subcultures, or styles of consumption. Paul Gilroy, for example, asserts that for the descendants http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism Duke University Press

Beyond Resistance: Notes Toward a New Caribbean Cultural Studies

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Small Axe, Inc.
ISSN
0799-0537
eISSN
1534-6714
DOI
10.1215/-7-2-23
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. Peter Wilson, Crab Antics: The Social Anthropology of English-Speaking Negro Societies of the Caribbean (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1973). 2. Gloss taken from Richard D. E. Burton, Afro-Creole: Power, Opposition, and Play in the Caribbean (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997), 162. For an overview of the impact of Wilson’s study on Caribbean anthropology, see Daniel Miller, Modernity: An Ethnographic Approach: Dualism and Mass Consumption in Trinidad (Oxford: Berg, 1994), 259–64. Small Axe 14, September 2003: pp. 23–38 ISSN 0799-0537 I submit that in recent years Caribbean cultural studies has emphasized and celebrated the antisystemic values of reputation to the exclusion of respectability. This is most obvious in the disproportionate study of carnival as compared to Christmas (an small imbalance that Daniel Miller has observed). Moreover, the privileging of reputation axe in Caribbean studies is continuous with a fetishization of resistance and transgression in cultural studies more broadly.³ In both cases, the fascination with resistance and transgression derives from a legitimate critique of statism and class reductionism, and an interest in the political possibilities they neglect—whether feminism and the New Social Movements, subcultures, or styles of consumption. Paul Gilroy, for example, asserts that for the descendants

Journal

Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of CriticismDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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