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"Berlin Days," 1892-1894: W. E. B. Du Bois and German Political Economy

"Berlin Days," 1892-1894: W. E. B. Du Bois and German Political Economy 80 Negro Freedom,’’ an essay he wrote in 1944 for Rayford Logan’s What the Negro Wants, Du Bois was quite clear about the importance of the year 1910, when he abandoned the Germans Gustav Schmoller and Max Weber (although I believe he meant Adolf Wagner rather than Weber) in favor of his Harvard professors William James and Josiah Royce.3 The implications of his essay have been missed by many Du Bois scholars; there is much evidence that his professors in Berlin were critical contributors to the strategy he embraced to mitigate racism in the United States for at least a decade, from his return in 1894 until 1910. In this essay, my goal, as a German historian, is to illuminate the ideas Du Bois imbibed from his Berlin professors and to point to the evidence of their influence in his first three books as well as on the Atlanta University Research Series on southern blacks after the turn of the century. This series has been ignored by American scholars, whose discourse has concerned whether Du Bois returned with German völkisch ideas. Du Bois’s thoughts had turned to Germany long before he enrolled at the University of Berlin. He http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture Duke University Press

"Berlin Days," 1892-1894: W. E. B. Du Bois and German Political Economy

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0190-3659
eISSN
1527-2141
DOI
10.1215/01903659-27-3-79
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

80 Negro Freedom,’’ an essay he wrote in 1944 for Rayford Logan’s What the Negro Wants, Du Bois was quite clear about the importance of the year 1910, when he abandoned the Germans Gustav Schmoller and Max Weber (although I believe he meant Adolf Wagner rather than Weber) in favor of his Harvard professors William James and Josiah Royce.3 The implications of his essay have been missed by many Du Bois scholars; there is much evidence that his professors in Berlin were critical contributors to the strategy he embraced to mitigate racism in the United States for at least a decade, from his return in 1894 until 1910. In this essay, my goal, as a German historian, is to illuminate the ideas Du Bois imbibed from his Berlin professors and to point to the evidence of their influence in his first three books as well as on the Atlanta University Research Series on southern blacks after the turn of the century. This series has been ignored by American scholars, whose discourse has concerned whether Du Bois returned with German völkisch ideas. Du Bois’s thoughts had turned to Germany long before he enrolled at the University of Berlin. He

Journal

boundary 2: an international journal of literature and cultureDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2000

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