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Asian/American: Historical Crossings of a Racial Frontier; The Deathly Embrace: Orientalism and Asian American Identity

Asian/American: Historical Crossings of a Racial Frontier; The Deathly Embrace: Orientalism and... American Literature demand. Collating the work with colonialist texts, including Spenser’s own View of the Present State of Ireland, Bach shows definitively that even these so-called private love poems are part of colonial discourse. An important part of Bach’s work is her discussion of resisting texts by the colonized: Irish poetry, for example, that depicts Ireland not as a readily submissive female but as a weeping one. While Irish and English works might present contrasting figures of Ireland, each is a relatively direct and unambiguous ideological construction. Brown’s and Crain’s books stay on the American side of the Atlantic. By choosing more local foci, Brown and Crain call attention to the technology of culture, giving more emphasis to the subtle contestations and negotiations that are always part of that project. Both do this by studying how children learned in the colonial (and for Crain, nineteenthcentury) United States, and with the help of what books. Copiously illustrated and beautifully produced, Crain’s The Story of A is a pleasure to hold, look at, and read. Playful and allusive in her treatment of texts, Crain’s wide-ranging analysis includes commentary on such presentday communication technologies as postmodern art, children’s television programming, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literature Duke University Press

Asian/American: Historical Crossings of a Racial Frontier; The Deathly Embrace: Orientalism and Asian American Identity

American Literature , Volume 74 (2) – Jun 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0002-9831
eISSN
1527-2117
DOI
10.1215/00029831-74-2-428
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Literature demand. Collating the work with colonialist texts, including Spenser’s own View of the Present State of Ireland, Bach shows definitively that even these so-called private love poems are part of colonial discourse. An important part of Bach’s work is her discussion of resisting texts by the colonized: Irish poetry, for example, that depicts Ireland not as a readily submissive female but as a weeping one. While Irish and English works might present contrasting figures of Ireland, each is a relatively direct and unambiguous ideological construction. Brown’s and Crain’s books stay on the American side of the Atlantic. By choosing more local foci, Brown and Crain call attention to the technology of culture, giving more emphasis to the subtle contestations and negotiations that are always part of that project. Both do this by studying how children learned in the colonial (and for Crain, nineteenthcentury) United States, and with the help of what books. Copiously illustrated and beautifully produced, Crain’s The Story of A is a pleasure to hold, look at, and read. Playful and allusive in her treatment of texts, Crain’s wide-ranging analysis includes commentary on such presentday communication technologies as postmodern art, children’s television programming, and

Journal

American LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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