Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

As Irrational As Bert and Bin Laden: The Production of Categories, Commodities, and Commensurability in the Era of Globalization

As Irrational As Bert and Bin Laden: The Production of Categories, Commodities, and... REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman David Pedersen Surrogate war, general violence, subversive activity, multiplication of small wars, widespread training of terrorists—each of these has intruded on our vision of war. . . . The borders . . . have been blurred. . . . U.S. Army General John R. Galvin, “Uncomfortable Wars: Towards a New Paradigm” Liberal democracy versus fanatic Islamist fundamentalism: that’s not a dialectic or even a geographic rivalry—it’s two worlds conceptually (though not, alas, physically) sealed off from one another. Hendrik Hertzberg, “The Bush Manifesto” O O n Friday, 5 October 2001, several hundred people in Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh, marched in the streets to denounce the beginning of U.S. military assaults on al-Qaeda training camps and Taliban government forces in Afghanistan. The protestors paraded with large posters that featured images of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden arranged in a collage with “Usama” written in This essay emerged from a colloquium series organized by the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History at the University of Michigan, held during fall 2001 to address the “proliferation of ‘states of emergency’ across the world” in the months after the airplane hijackings and attacks. I thank Fernando Coronil, Ann Stoler, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

As Irrational As Bert and Bin Laden: The Production of Categories, Commodities, and Commensurability in the Era of Globalization

Public Culture , Volume 15 (2) – Apr 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/as-irrational-as-bert-and-bin-laden-the-production-of-categories-7TvxVhxCdo
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-15-2-238
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman David Pedersen Surrogate war, general violence, subversive activity, multiplication of small wars, widespread training of terrorists—each of these has intruded on our vision of war. . . . The borders . . . have been blurred. . . . U.S. Army General John R. Galvin, “Uncomfortable Wars: Towards a New Paradigm” Liberal democracy versus fanatic Islamist fundamentalism: that’s not a dialectic or even a geographic rivalry—it’s two worlds conceptually (though not, alas, physically) sealed off from one another. Hendrik Hertzberg, “The Bush Manifesto” O O n Friday, 5 October 2001, several hundred people in Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh, marched in the streets to denounce the beginning of U.S. military assaults on al-Qaeda training camps and Taliban government forces in Afghanistan. The protestors paraded with large posters that featured images of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden arranged in a collage with “Usama” written in This essay emerged from a colloquium series organized by the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History at the University of Michigan, held during fall 2001 to address the “proliferation of ‘states of emergency’ across the world” in the months after the airplane hijackings and attacks. I thank Fernando Coronil, Ann Stoler,

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.