AS GOOD AS IT GETS: Queer Theory and Critical Disability

AS GOOD AS IT GETS: Queer Theory and Critical Disability In queer studies it is at this point a well-established critical practice to remark on heterosexuality’s supposed invisibility.1 As the heterosexual norm congealed during the twentieth century, it was the “homosexual menace” that was specified and embodied; the subsequent policing and containment of that menace allowed the new heterosexual normalcy to remain unspecified and disembodied.2 Although as early as 1915 Sigmund Freud, in his revised “Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex,” declared that “the exclusive sexual interest of the man for the woman is also a problem requiring an explanation, and is not something that is self-evident and explainable on the basis of chemical attraction,” such observations remained— indeed, as Freud’s comments literally were—mere footnotes in the project of excavating deviance.3 Heterosexuality, never speaking — as Michel Foucault famously said of homosexuality—“in its own behalf, to demand that its legitimacy or ‘naturality’ be acknowledged,” thereby passed as universal love and intimacy, coextensive not with a specific form of opposite-sex eros but with humanity itself.4 Heterosexuality’s partners in this masquerade have been largely identified; an important body of feminist and antiracist work considers how heteronormativity reinforces dominant ideologies of gender and race.5 However, despite the fact that homosexuality http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

AS GOOD AS IT GETS: Queer Theory and Critical Disability

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/as-good-as-it-gets-queer-theory-and-critical-disability-JWVhf5NFOr
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1527-9375
D.O.I.
10.1215/10642684-9-1-2-79
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In queer studies it is at this point a well-established critical practice to remark on heterosexuality’s supposed invisibility.1 As the heterosexual norm congealed during the twentieth century, it was the “homosexual menace” that was specified and embodied; the subsequent policing and containment of that menace allowed the new heterosexual normalcy to remain unspecified and disembodied.2 Although as early as 1915 Sigmund Freud, in his revised “Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex,” declared that “the exclusive sexual interest of the man for the woman is also a problem requiring an explanation, and is not something that is self-evident and explainable on the basis of chemical attraction,” such observations remained— indeed, as Freud’s comments literally were—mere footnotes in the project of excavating deviance.3 Heterosexuality, never speaking — as Michel Foucault famously said of homosexuality—“in its own behalf, to demand that its legitimacy or ‘naturality’ be acknowledged,” thereby passed as universal love and intimacy, coextensive not with a specific form of opposite-sex eros but with humanity itself.4 Heterosexuality’s partners in this masquerade have been largely identified; an important body of feminist and antiracist work considers how heteronormativity reinforces dominant ideologies of gender and race.5 However, despite the fact that homosexuality

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off