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Artworks

Artworks Public Culture the audience to encounter the city on its own terms, and along the way to become the primary performer. The first piece, Invisible Cities (1994), gave the group its name and working model. ICG was founded by experimental theater artists Lesley Bannatyne and Gary Duehr after they lost their resident space. Since they had always wanted to create public art and impact lives in a more direct way, they enlisted visual artist Robert Goss to help transform city streets into a performance arena. These three codirectors then sought out local visual and performing artists to participate. The form of a dérive, invented by Situationists in Paris in the 1950s, provided inspiration. A drift down city streets to gather urban ambiances, the French dérive was undertaken by the artists themselves, who then documented their walking tour in writing and artworks. Marxist in orientation, the event was intended to create a vision of a new city by mapping its psychogeography. Invisible Cities, milder in its politics, implied a hidden value in a neglected part of the city, and used the neighborhood as a found object, as raw material on which to build. Unlike a dérive, the audience—instead of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Artworks

Public Culture , Volume 11 (3) – Oct 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-11-3-563
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Public Culture the audience to encounter the city on its own terms, and along the way to become the primary performer. The first piece, Invisible Cities (1994), gave the group its name and working model. ICG was founded by experimental theater artists Lesley Bannatyne and Gary Duehr after they lost their resident space. Since they had always wanted to create public art and impact lives in a more direct way, they enlisted visual artist Robert Goss to help transform city streets into a performance arena. These three codirectors then sought out local visual and performing artists to participate. The form of a dérive, invented by Situationists in Paris in the 1950s, provided inspiration. A drift down city streets to gather urban ambiances, the French dérive was undertaken by the artists themselves, who then documented their walking tour in writing and artworks. Marxist in orientation, the event was intended to create a vision of a new city by mapping its psychogeography. Invisible Cities, milder in its politics, implied a hidden value in a neglected part of the city, and used the neighborhood as a found object, as raw material on which to build. Unlike a dérive, the audience—instead of

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 1999

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