Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Alma Mater: College, Kinship, and The Pursuit of Diversity

Alma Mater: College, Kinship, and The Pursuit of Diversity Catherine Prendergast and Nancy Abelmann In June of 2003 the Supreme Court handed down its decision in the much-discussed affirmative action case Grutter v. Bollinger. The majority opinion, written by swing vote Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, validated the consideration of race in university admissions in the name of the educational value of diversity. Bolstered by petitions from Fortune 500 companies hungry for diverse employees to appeal to an increasingly diverse consumer base and manage an even more diverse global labor force, Grutter offered a picture of the harmonious university family where students learn from each other’s differences. Importantly, because the Grutter university family is to be comfortable, bearing nothing of the scars of past oppression, it echoes today’s university marketing in which a safe, secure, and only incidentally diverse community is promised to aspiring applicants.1 The current moment is one that finds universities busily selling themselves on the return of a comfortable, but not disturbingly diverse, in loco parentis and finds race to be part of that sale. 2 Investigations of corporate and academic connections have proliferated in recent years as various scholars have explored the relationship between the market and the academy. The Grutter decision reminds us http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Alma Mater: College, Kinship, and The Pursuit of Diversity

Social Text , Volume 24 (1 86) – Mar 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/alma-mater-college-kinship-and-the-pursuit-of-diversity-9T4QCH38za
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2006 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-24-1_86-37
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Catherine Prendergast and Nancy Abelmann In June of 2003 the Supreme Court handed down its decision in the much-discussed affirmative action case Grutter v. Bollinger. The majority opinion, written by swing vote Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, validated the consideration of race in university admissions in the name of the educational value of diversity. Bolstered by petitions from Fortune 500 companies hungry for diverse employees to appeal to an increasingly diverse consumer base and manage an even more diverse global labor force, Grutter offered a picture of the harmonious university family where students learn from each other’s differences. Importantly, because the Grutter university family is to be comfortable, bearing nothing of the scars of past oppression, it echoes today’s university marketing in which a safe, secure, and only incidentally diverse community is promised to aspiring applicants.1 The current moment is one that finds universities busily selling themselves on the return of a comfortable, but not disturbingly diverse, in loco parentis and finds race to be part of that sale. 2 Investigations of corporate and academic connections have proliferated in recent years as various scholars have explored the relationship between the market and the academy. The Grutter decision reminds us

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2006

There are no references for this article.