Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

A World Destroyed, A Nation Imposed: The 1937 Haitian Massacre in the Dominican Republic

A World Destroyed, A Nation Imposed: The 1937 Haitian Massacre in the Dominican Republic Hispanic American Historical Review 82:3 Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press HAHR / August / Turits can troops poured into this vast region,1 and, with the assistance of alcaldes pedáneos (submunicipal political authorities) and some civilian reserves, rounded up and slaughtered with machete perhaps 15,000 ethnic Haitians.2 Those killed in this operation—still frequently referred to as el corte (the cutting) by Dominicans and as kout kouto-a (the stabbing) by Haitians —were mostly small farmers, many of whom had been born in the Dominican Republic (and thus were Dominican citizens according to the Dominican constitution) and some whose families had lived in the Dominican Republic for generations.3 Haitians were 1. The northern frontier, an area covering some 5,000 square kilometers, includes present-day provinces of Monte Cristi, Dajabón, Santiago Rodríguez, and the northern tip of Elías Piña. Together with the southern and central frontier areas, which include the provinces of Pedernales, Barahona, Independencia, and most of Baoruco, San Juan, and Elías Piña, the region encompasses roughly one-fourth of the country’s approximately 48,000 square kilometers. Dominicans use the term la Frontera to refer to all of these areas. 2. The conventional figure of Haitian deaths given in the Dominican Republic is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic American Historical Review Duke University Press

A World Destroyed, A Nation Imposed: The 1937 Haitian Massacre in the Dominican Republic

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/a-world-destroyed-a-nation-imposed-the-1937-haitian-massacre-in-the-JlfH4MmsSX
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2168
eISSN
1527-1900
DOI
10.1215/00182168-82-3-589
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hispanic American Historical Review 82:3 Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press HAHR / August / Turits can troops poured into this vast region,1 and, with the assistance of alcaldes pedáneos (submunicipal political authorities) and some civilian reserves, rounded up and slaughtered with machete perhaps 15,000 ethnic Haitians.2 Those killed in this operation—still frequently referred to as el corte (the cutting) by Dominicans and as kout kouto-a (the stabbing) by Haitians —were mostly small farmers, many of whom had been born in the Dominican Republic (and thus were Dominican citizens according to the Dominican constitution) and some whose families had lived in the Dominican Republic for generations.3 Haitians were 1. The northern frontier, an area covering some 5,000 square kilometers, includes present-day provinces of Monte Cristi, Dajabón, Santiago Rodríguez, and the northern tip of Elías Piña. Together with the southern and central frontier areas, which include the provinces of Pedernales, Barahona, Independencia, and most of Baoruco, San Juan, and Elías Piña, the region encompasses roughly one-fourth of the country’s approximately 48,000 square kilometers. Dominicans use the term la Frontera to refer to all of these areas. 2. The conventional figure of Haitian deaths given in the Dominican Republic is

Journal

Hispanic American Historical ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.