Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

A "Sensation" Chronicle

A "Sensation" Chronicle Page 127 The controversy began on 22 September 1999, when Mayor Rudolph Giuliani of New York attacked the Brooklyn Museum of Art for its plan to present “Sensation: Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection,” calling work in the show “sick stuff ” that “desecrates religion.” Giuliani’s attacks were widely seen as politically motivated by his nascent U.S. Senate campaign against Hillary Clinton. When the Brooklyn Museum proceeded to present the exhibition as planned, Giuliani withheld the city funding that makes up almost one-third of the museum’s budget. During the weeks that followed, the mayor’s threats escalated to include evicting the museum from its city-owned building and taking over its board of trustees; at the same time, his attacks expanded to include charges that the museum violated its charter by presenting an exhibition that was more commercial than educational and betrayed the public trust by securing funding from sources with financial interests in the show. The Brooklyn Museum responded to these attacks by filing a suit against the city for violating First Amendment protections for free expression. On 1 November, less than six weeks later, a federal judge of the United States District Court in Brooklyn ruled that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

A "Sensation" Chronicle

Social Text , Volume 19 (2 67) – Jun 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/a-sensation-chronicle-OcgV0DkEup
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-19-2_67-127
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 127 The controversy began on 22 September 1999, when Mayor Rudolph Giuliani of New York attacked the Brooklyn Museum of Art for its plan to present “Sensation: Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection,” calling work in the show “sick stuff ” that “desecrates religion.” Giuliani’s attacks were widely seen as politically motivated by his nascent U.S. Senate campaign against Hillary Clinton. When the Brooklyn Museum proceeded to present the exhibition as planned, Giuliani withheld the city funding that makes up almost one-third of the museum’s budget. During the weeks that followed, the mayor’s threats escalated to include evicting the museum from its city-owned building and taking over its board of trustees; at the same time, his attacks expanded to include charges that the museum violated its charter by presenting an exhibition that was more commercial than educational and betrayed the public trust by securing funding from sources with financial interests in the show. The Brooklyn Museum responded to these attacks by filing a suit against the city for violating First Amendment protections for free expression. On 1 November, less than six weeks later, a federal judge of the United States District Court in Brooklyn ruled that

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.