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A Roadmap to Millennial Japan

A Roadmap to Millennial Japan overview of the context that brings together the articles in this issue: the ongoing discursive construction of Japan during the long economic downturn of the s. A huge volume of commentaries on the malaise afflicting Japan, unleashed particularly from the neoliberal and neonationalist camps, has fed into and shaped the impression of overall national doom. Against this backdrop, the present essay points out a significant degree of complicity between the Japanese neoliberals and neonationalists, despite their apparent disagreements on their attitudes toward economic globalization and the role of nation-states today. I examine some of the representative claims made by the two sides, analyzing the politics involved in their discursive manufacturing of the ‘‘crisis.’’ In the latter half of the essay I explore some theoretical frameworks through which to make sense of s Japan that counters the widespread tendency to isolate it both spatially and temporally. Instead of defining the s through the recession and its effects, I suggest examining the decade in relation to the The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Fall . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. 6482 SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY 99:4 / sheet 16 of 354 Tomiko Yoda broader historical trends of globalization and postmodernization http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

A Roadmap to Millennial Japan

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 99 (4) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-99-4-629
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

overview of the context that brings together the articles in this issue: the ongoing discursive construction of Japan during the long economic downturn of the s. A huge volume of commentaries on the malaise afflicting Japan, unleashed particularly from the neoliberal and neonationalist camps, has fed into and shaped the impression of overall national doom. Against this backdrop, the present essay points out a significant degree of complicity between the Japanese neoliberals and neonationalists, despite their apparent disagreements on their attitudes toward economic globalization and the role of nation-states today. I examine some of the representative claims made by the two sides, analyzing the politics involved in their discursive manufacturing of the ‘‘crisis.’’ In the latter half of the essay I explore some theoretical frameworks through which to make sense of s Japan that counters the widespread tendency to isolate it both spatially and temporally. Instead of defining the s through the recession and its effects, I suggest examining the decade in relation to the The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Fall . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. 6482 SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY 99:4 / sheet 16 of 354 Tomiko Yoda broader historical trends of globalization and postmodernization

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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