Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Road to "A Redeemed Mankind": The Politics of Memory among the Former Japanese Peasant Settlers in Manchuria

A Road to "A Redeemed Mankind": The Politics of Memory among the Former Japanese Peasant Settlers... The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Mariko Asano Tamanoi In this article I ask this question in my own fieldwork on the former Japanese peasant settlers in Manchuria, Japan’s de facto colony in the early twentieth century. They were peasants, impoverished in the wave of economic recessions, who tried to build their new homes in Northeast China, then called Manchuria. In  Japan secured a leasehold of its southern tip, called the Liaodong Peninsula, from Russia as part of war indemnities. The wave of Japanese emigration to Manchuria (and Far East Russia), however, began a few decades earlier.2 By  about , Japanese, mostly soldiers, entrepreneurs, women offering services to the male immigrants, and the employees of the South Manchurian Railway Company, had moved to the cities in southern Manchuria.3 In , after having seized northern Manchuria, Japan established Manchukuo. Although it was a Japanese invention, ‘‘a separate state under Chinese leaders who took their orders from Japanese officers and civilian officials,’’ Japan presented it as an independent nation to the international community.4 Most of the peasant settlers left for Manchuria after . These settlers as well as the earlier http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

A Road to "A Redeemed Mankind": The Politics of Memory among the Former Japanese Peasant Settlers in Manchuria

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 99 (1) – Jan 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/a-road-to-a-redeemed-mankind-the-politics-of-memory-among-the-former-dlnxylmwZr
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-99-1-163
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Mariko Asano Tamanoi In this article I ask this question in my own fieldwork on the former Japanese peasant settlers in Manchuria, Japan’s de facto colony in the early twentieth century. They were peasants, impoverished in the wave of economic recessions, who tried to build their new homes in Northeast China, then called Manchuria. In  Japan secured a leasehold of its southern tip, called the Liaodong Peninsula, from Russia as part of war indemnities. The wave of Japanese emigration to Manchuria (and Far East Russia), however, began a few decades earlier.2 By  about , Japanese, mostly soldiers, entrepreneurs, women offering services to the male immigrants, and the employees of the South Manchurian Railway Company, had moved to the cities in southern Manchuria.3 In , after having seized northern Manchuria, Japan established Manchukuo. Although it was a Japanese invention, ‘‘a separate state under Chinese leaders who took their orders from Japanese officers and civilian officials,’’ Japan presented it as an independent nation to the international community.4 Most of the peasant settlers left for Manchuria after . These settlers as well as the earlier

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.