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A Note on Hayek and Anti-Semitism

A Note on Hayek and Anti-Semitism intelligentsia of Vienna and who proved to be far ahead of me in literary education and general precociousness. (845) In what, then, does the evidence consist that leads Reder to conclude that Hayek was an anti-Semite? The totality of Reder’s “evidence” lies in five quotations from Hayek on Hayek that touch on Jews in prewar Vienna. They are as follows: 1. Hayek recounts that Vienna tended to divide itself along religious lines in the 1920s and 1930s and as a result a three-part division took shape: on the one hand, Jews; on the other, Christians; and a third, middle group comprising, in the main, baptized Jews and Jews and Christians who were prepared to mingle with each other. It was to this group that Hayek belonged. Hayek goes on to note that those Jews who fell into the totally Jewish group did not fraternize with either Christians or members of the mixed group and that accounts for why it is out of the question that he could have met Freud, a member of the Jewish group (Kresge and Wenar 1994, 59). This “perceived trichotomy” (Reder’s term), in which two groups of Jews are distinguished, Reder finds suspect, although http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

A Note on Hayek and Anti-Semitism

History of Political Economy , Volume 34 (1) – Mar 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-34-1-255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

intelligentsia of Vienna and who proved to be far ahead of me in literary education and general precociousness. (845) In what, then, does the evidence consist that leads Reder to conclude that Hayek was an anti-Semite? The totality of Reder’s “evidence” lies in five quotations from Hayek on Hayek that touch on Jews in prewar Vienna. They are as follows: 1. Hayek recounts that Vienna tended to divide itself along religious lines in the 1920s and 1930s and as a result a three-part division took shape: on the one hand, Jews; on the other, Christians; and a third, middle group comprising, in the main, baptized Jews and Jews and Christians who were prepared to mingle with each other. It was to this group that Hayek belonged. Hayek goes on to note that those Jews who fell into the totally Jewish group did not fraternize with either Christians or members of the mixed group and that accounts for why it is out of the question that he could have met Freud, a member of the Jewish group (Kresge and Wenar 1994, 59). This “perceived trichotomy” (Reder’s term), in which two groups of Jews are distinguished, Reder finds suspect, although

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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