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A METHODOLOGICAL SUGGESTION ON /aj/ UNGLIDING

A METHODOLOGICAL SUGGESTION ON /aj/ UNGLIDING Arguably, the “greenwashing” of the English lexicon began in 1969 when, according to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED2 1989), two West German environmental groups formed two political parties: Grüne Aktion Zukunft ‘Green Campaign for the Future’ and grüne Listen ‘Green Lists’.1 Add to these groups the first “Earth Day” celebration on 22 April 1970, and perhaps the key “green” players are in place. If one of their goals was to raise awareness about the degradation of the environment—or “eco-consciousness”—then no doubt they were victorious, at least in terms of inserting green discourse into the language. One such item, eco-, is firmly positioned in the lexicon. In the 1972 volume of American Speech, Russell and Porter provide written citations from 1971–73 for the following examples: eco-awareness, eco-Bag, eco-house, ecomodel, econut, and ecopolypse. Eco- continues to be a popular modifier in contemporary English and has become more diverse and flexible in its use as a combining form. A Lexis-Nexis search for eco- reveals that on 27 October 1998 London’s Daily Telegraph ran a headline declaring “Energy Efficiency: Eco-homes Return to the Earth.” Similarly, other headlines read: “Ecoterrorists Set Major Fire in Attack on Popular Ski Resort”; “German Truckers Battle Eco-tax”; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

A METHODOLOGICAL SUGGESTION ON /aj/ UNGLIDING

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-75-2-221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Arguably, the “greenwashing” of the English lexicon began in 1969 when, according to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED2 1989), two West German environmental groups formed two political parties: Grüne Aktion Zukunft ‘Green Campaign for the Future’ and grüne Listen ‘Green Lists’.1 Add to these groups the first “Earth Day” celebration on 22 April 1970, and perhaps the key “green” players are in place. If one of their goals was to raise awareness about the degradation of the environment—or “eco-consciousness”—then no doubt they were victorious, at least in terms of inserting green discourse into the language. One such item, eco-, is firmly positioned in the lexicon. In the 1972 volume of American Speech, Russell and Porter provide written citations from 1971–73 for the following examples: eco-awareness, eco-Bag, eco-house, ecomodel, econut, and ecopolypse. Eco- continues to be a popular modifier in contemporary English and has become more diverse and flexible in its use as a combining form. A Lexis-Nexis search for eco- reveals that on 27 October 1998 London’s Daily Telegraph ran a headline declaring “Energy Efficiency: Eco-homes Return to the Earth.” Similarly, other headlines read: “Ecoterrorists Set Major Fire in Attack on Popular Ski Resort”; “German Truckers Battle Eco-tax”;

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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