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A GOOD TEXTBOOK; American English: Dialects and Variation

A GOOD TEXTBOOK; American English: Dialects and Variation American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 2, Summer 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society the origins, development, and characteristic features of these particular language varieties. The length of the videos makes it highly feasible to incorporate them into a class, and the material is presented in such a way as to be informative and interesting to an audience with all levels of linguistic knowledge. “I definitely think there’s a place for all dialects,” states Ocracoke historian Alton Ballance in the video The Ocracoke Brogue. He then adds, “There could be nothing worse in this world than if we all spoke the same way.” In many ways, these statements capture the premise and theme of this collection of educational materials, which serve to describe two particular American dialects and to explain their importance both for the speakers of these dialects and for the richness of American English more generally. For readers who have seen the educational video American Tongues (Kolker and Alvarez 1987), the format of the two videos will be familiar: a good amount of footage of speakers talking about their language variety and speaking in their language variety, complemented by narrative explaining some of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

A GOOD TEXTBOOK; American English: Dialects and Variation

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-77-2-221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 2, Summer 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society the origins, development, and characteristic features of these particular language varieties. The length of the videos makes it highly feasible to incorporate them into a class, and the material is presented in such a way as to be informative and interesting to an audience with all levels of linguistic knowledge. “I definitely think there’s a place for all dialects,” states Ocracoke historian Alton Ballance in the video The Ocracoke Brogue. He then adds, “There could be nothing worse in this world than if we all spoke the same way.” In many ways, these statements capture the premise and theme of this collection of educational materials, which serve to describe two particular American dialects and to explain their importance both for the speakers of these dialects and for the richness of American English more generally. For readers who have seen the educational video American Tongues (Kolker and Alvarez 1987), the format of the two videos will be familiar: a good amount of footage of speakers talking about their language variety and speaking in their language variety, complemented by narrative explaining some of the

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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