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A GOOD GUIDE TO AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH: African American English: A Linguistic Introduction

A GOOD GUIDE TO AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH: African American English: A Linguistic Introduction American Speech, Vol. 79, No. 2, Summer 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the American Dialect Society This brief summary of the chapters reveals the editors’ success in providing an overview of Southern English, past and present. The inclusion of three chapters on the origins of Southern American English, not to mention Wolfram’s chapter on enclave communities and Tillery and Bailey’s chapter on linguistic innovation in the South, leaves the reader with a sense of the roots of Southern American English. The two chapters on African American English also include discussions of the origins of those varieties with respect to the development of white varieties in the South. The current status of Southern American English is also well established in the chapters on grammatical, phonological, and stylistic aspects of Southern speech by Bernstein, Feagin, Wolfram, Eble, Tillery and Bailey, and Johnstone. A second aspect of the “past and present” theme that runs throughout the volume is the use of a variety of data sources, particularly in the latter chapters where the authors provide specific examples of linguistic phenomena. Linguistic fieldwork in the twentieth century provided most of the data, but these sources themselves reflect a wide temporal range from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

A GOOD GUIDE TO AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH: African American English: A Linguistic Introduction

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-79-2-219
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Speech, Vol. 79, No. 2, Summer 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the American Dialect Society This brief summary of the chapters reveals the editors’ success in providing an overview of Southern English, past and present. The inclusion of three chapters on the origins of Southern American English, not to mention Wolfram’s chapter on enclave communities and Tillery and Bailey’s chapter on linguistic innovation in the South, leaves the reader with a sense of the roots of Southern American English. The two chapters on African American English also include discussions of the origins of those varieties with respect to the development of white varieties in the South. The current status of Southern American English is also well established in the chapters on grammatical, phonological, and stylistic aspects of Southern speech by Bernstein, Feagin, Wolfram, Eble, Tillery and Bailey, and Johnstone. A second aspect of the “past and present” theme that runs throughout the volume is the use of a variety of data sources, particularly in the latter chapters where the authors provide specific examples of linguistic phenomena. Linguistic fieldwork in the twentieth century provided most of the data, but these sources themselves reflect a wide temporal range from

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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