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A. F. W. Crome's Measurements of the "Strength of the State": Statistical Representations in Central Europe around 1800

A. F. W. Crome's Measurements of the "Strength of the State": Statistical Representations in... Sybilla Nikolow universities in this period as well as the heated controversy over the role of measurement and table making in the study of the state. The part of Crome’s work that has been almost completely forgotten by historians illustrates an interesting passage point in the history of state-crafting measurement. He used numerical terms to represent the knowledge of the territory within the tradition of geographical state description. His aim was to evaluate and compare internal and external power relations in Europe. He studied, compared, and related the size of the population, the area, the revenue income, and the military power and eventually systematized these figures as “the strengths of the state.” In the first part of my essay, I will show how Crome’s statistical writings can be conceptualized within the German tradition of state description. Second, I will describe how and explain why he represented the state statistically and visually in the manner that he did. In the third part of my essay, I will demonstrate the implications of Crome’s numerical abstractions as I discuss the contemporary scholarly criticism of the use of statistical numbers and tables in scholarship on the state. What the critics rejected as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

A. F. W. Crome's Measurements of the "Strength of the State": Statistical Representations in Central Europe around 1800

History of Political Economy , Volume 33 (Suppl 1) – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-33-Suppl_1-23
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sybilla Nikolow universities in this period as well as the heated controversy over the role of measurement and table making in the study of the state. The part of Crome’s work that has been almost completely forgotten by historians illustrates an interesting passage point in the history of state-crafting measurement. He used numerical terms to represent the knowledge of the territory within the tradition of geographical state description. His aim was to evaluate and compare internal and external power relations in Europe. He studied, compared, and related the size of the population, the area, the revenue income, and the military power and eventually systematized these figures as “the strengths of the state.” In the first part of my essay, I will show how Crome’s statistical writings can be conceptualized within the German tradition of state description. Second, I will describe how and explain why he represented the state statistically and visually in the manner that he did. In the third part of my essay, I will demonstrate the implications of Crome’s numerical abstractions as I discuss the contemporary scholarly criticism of the use of statistical numbers and tables in scholarship on the state. What the critics rejected as

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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