Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A DEBT REPAID: HONORING ROGER SHUY: Language in Action: New Studies of Language in Society

A DEBT REPAID: HONORING ROGER SHUY: Language in Action: New Studies of Language in Society spect, he details efforts to preserve the endangered dialect of the Ocracoke community on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. In “Sociolinguistics in Deaf Communities: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?” Ceil Lucas provides an excellent overview of research in the sociolinguistics of the Deaf community. After reviewing a set of considerations about the relation between the spoken language and the sign language that defined and limited the earliest research in the Deaf community, she emphasizes the need to realize that the “models developed for spoken languages cannot be automatically applied to sign language situations” (48) and that eventually studies of Deaf communities may provide models that shed insight into the nature of spoken languages. In “Language Politics and the Sociolinguistic Historiography of Spanish in the United States,” Reynaldo F. Macías argues that an informed understanding of the history of Spanish and English in the United States is crucial to overcome the “distorted notions tied to a popular language ideology” (80)—the English-Only Movement. He emphasizes the need for research detailing the sociolinguistic history of other languages in the United States. Drawing upon limited records, he presents a series of language profiles for the nineteenth and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

A DEBT REPAID: HONORING ROGER SHUY: Language in Action: New Studies of Language in Society

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/a-debt-repaid-honoring-roger-shuy-language-in-action-new-studies-of-uSj7YVtvj2
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-79-4-428
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

spect, he details efforts to preserve the endangered dialect of the Ocracoke community on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. In “Sociolinguistics in Deaf Communities: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?” Ceil Lucas provides an excellent overview of research in the sociolinguistics of the Deaf community. After reviewing a set of considerations about the relation between the spoken language and the sign language that defined and limited the earliest research in the Deaf community, she emphasizes the need to realize that the “models developed for spoken languages cannot be automatically applied to sign language situations” (48) and that eventually studies of Deaf communities may provide models that shed insight into the nature of spoken languages. In “Language Politics and the Sociolinguistic Historiography of Spanish in the United States,” Reynaldo F. Macías argues that an informed understanding of the history of Spanish and English in the United States is crucial to overcome the “distorted notions tied to a popular language ideology” (80)—the English-Only Movement. He emphasizes the need for research detailing the sociolinguistic history of other languages in the United States. Drawing upon limited records, he presents a series of language profiles for the nineteenth and

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.