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Lexicography and the Philosophy of Science

Lexicography and the Philosophy of Science William Frawley Dictionaries: Journal of the Dictionary Society of North America, Number 3, 1980/1981, pp. 18-27 (Article) Published by Dictionary Society of North America DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/dic.1980.0016 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/456351/summary Access provided at 20 Feb 2020 05:23 GMT from JHU Libraries LEXICOGRAPHY AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE William Frawley This paper1 is designed to show how lexicography can come to the aid of a descriptive philosophy of science, a project which doubtless suggests that there is presently something amiss in the philosophy of science. Indeed, there is something wrong. Let begin by demonstrating that the philosophy of science is in need of considerable help. What is the philosophy of science? It is the discipline which seeks to describe the nature, origin, and progress scientific knowledge. Such a systematic and exhaustive cataloguing of scientific knowledge, however, has been realized only sporadically. Harold Brown's pertinent comments point this out: one of the striking aspects . . . that we shall continually encounter is a consistent lack of detailed analysis of actual scientific theories or of examples of scientific research. Rather what we find ... is the analysis of propositional forms, the con- struction of aritificial languages and calculi, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dictionaries: Journal of the Dictionary Society of North America Dictionary Society of North America

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Publisher
Dictionary Society of North America
Copyright
Copyright © The Dictionary Society of North America
ISSN
2160-5076

Abstract

William Frawley Dictionaries: Journal of the Dictionary Society of North America, Number 3, 1980/1981, pp. 18-27 (Article) Published by Dictionary Society of North America DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/dic.1980.0016 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/456351/summary Access provided at 20 Feb 2020 05:23 GMT from JHU Libraries LEXICOGRAPHY AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE William Frawley This paper1 is designed to show how lexicography can come to the aid of a descriptive philosophy of science, a project which doubtless suggests that there is presently something amiss in the philosophy of science. Indeed, there is something wrong. Let begin by demonstrating that the philosophy of science is in need of considerable help. What is the philosophy of science? It is the discipline which seeks to describe the nature, origin, and progress scientific knowledge. Such a systematic and exhaustive cataloguing of scientific knowledge, however, has been realized only sporadically. Harold Brown's pertinent comments point this out: one of the striking aspects . . . that we shall continually encounter is a consistent lack of detailed analysis of actual scientific theories or of examples of scientific research. Rather what we find ... is the analysis of propositional forms, the con- struction of aritificial languages and calculi,

Journal

Dictionaries: Journal of the Dictionary Society of North AmericaDictionary Society of North America

Published: Apr 4, 2012

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