Why do we have opioid-receptors in peripheral tissues? Not for relief of pain by opioids

Why do we have opioid-receptors in peripheral tissues? Not for relief of pain by opioids In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Ethem Akural and coworkers [1] report pain relieving effect of peripheral morphine after surgical removal of third molars from inflamed tissue. The authors compared morphine 2 mg injected locally with intra-muscular injection. Their analyses indicated that morphine produced better pain relief when injected locally into inflamed tissue around the molar-bed, compared with morphine injected systemically into a muscle. The effect appeared to depend on local inflammation because they did not observe this analgesic effect of morphine injected into non-inflamed tissue. The classification of tissue with an inflammatory or a non-inflammatory reaction was made prior to randomization. The most prominent difference in pain relief appeared between 2 and 6 h after the surgical intervention.1Peripheral analgesic effects of morphineThe concept of injecting morphine into loco dolenti was presented by the Finnish professor Knut Felix von Willebrand as early as 1876 [2]. He focused on the undesirable opioid side effects of systemically administered morphine, and he presented four case reports that indicated that morphine should be administered into the painful tissue. About 100 years later peripheral antinociceptive effect of morphine was demonstrated after subcutaneous injection of prostaglandin E2 in rats [3], and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Why do we have opioid-receptors in peripheral tissues? Not for relief of pain by opioids

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/why-do-we-have-opioid-receptors-in-peripheral-tissues-not-for-relief-1LG7rbS9gl
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.01.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Ethem Akural and coworkers [1] report pain relieving effect of peripheral morphine after surgical removal of third molars from inflamed tissue. The authors compared morphine 2 mg injected locally with intra-muscular injection. Their analyses indicated that morphine produced better pain relief when injected locally into inflamed tissue around the molar-bed, compared with morphine injected systemically into a muscle. The effect appeared to depend on local inflammation because they did not observe this analgesic effect of morphine injected into non-inflamed tissue. The classification of tissue with an inflammatory or a non-inflammatory reaction was made prior to randomization. The most prominent difference in pain relief appeared between 2 and 6 h after the surgical intervention.1Peripheral analgesic effects of morphineThe concept of injecting morphine into loco dolenti was presented by the Finnish professor Knut Felix von Willebrand as early as 1876 [2]. He focused on the undesirable opioid side effects of systemically administered morphine, and he presented four case reports that indicated that morphine should be administered into the painful tissue. About 100 years later peripheral antinociceptive effect of morphine was demonstrated after subcutaneous injection of prostaglandin E2 in rats [3], and the

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off