Whole blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow velocities in obese hypertensive or obese normotensive adolescents

Whole blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow velocities in obese hypertensive or obese... AbstractBackground:Obesity affects all major organ systems and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Whole blood viscosity is an important independent regulator of cerebral blood flow. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of whole blood viscosity on cerebral artery blood flow velocities using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in pediatric patients with obesity compared to healthy controls and analyze the effect of whole blood viscosity and blood pressure status to the cerebral artery blood flow velocities.Methods:Sixty patients with obesity diagnosed according to their body mass index (BMI) percentiles aged 13–18 years old were prospectively enrolled. They were grouped as hypertensive or normotensive according to their ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Whole blood viscosity and middle cerebral artery velocities by transcranial Doppler ultrasound were studied and compared to 20 healthy same aged controls.Results:Whole blood viscosity values in hypertensive (0.0619±0.0077 poise) and normotensive (0.0607±0.0071 poise) groups were higher than controls (0.0616±0.0064 poise), with no significance. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities were higher in the obese hypertensive (73.9±15.0 cm/s) and obese normotensive groups (75.2±13.5 cm/s) than controls (66.4±11.5 cm/s), but with no statistical significance.Conclusions:Physiological changes in blood viscosity and changes in blood pressure did not seem to have any direct effect on cerebral blood flow velocities, the reason might be that the cerebral circulation is capable of adaptively modulating itself to changes to maintain a uniform cerebral blood flow. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

Whole blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow velocities in obese hypertensive or obese normotensive adolescents

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2191-0251
eISSN
2191-0251
D.O.I.
10.1515/jpem-2017-0436
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground:Obesity affects all major organ systems and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Whole blood viscosity is an important independent regulator of cerebral blood flow. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of whole blood viscosity on cerebral artery blood flow velocities using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in pediatric patients with obesity compared to healthy controls and analyze the effect of whole blood viscosity and blood pressure status to the cerebral artery blood flow velocities.Methods:Sixty patients with obesity diagnosed according to their body mass index (BMI) percentiles aged 13–18 years old were prospectively enrolled. They were grouped as hypertensive or normotensive according to their ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Whole blood viscosity and middle cerebral artery velocities by transcranial Doppler ultrasound were studied and compared to 20 healthy same aged controls.Results:Whole blood viscosity values in hypertensive (0.0619±0.0077 poise) and normotensive (0.0607±0.0071 poise) groups were higher than controls (0.0616±0.0064 poise), with no significance. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities were higher in the obese hypertensive (73.9±15.0 cm/s) and obese normotensive groups (75.2±13.5 cm/s) than controls (66.4±11.5 cm/s), but with no statistical significance.Conclusions:Physiological changes in blood viscosity and changes in blood pressure did not seem to have any direct effect on cerebral blood flow velocities, the reason might be that the cerebral circulation is capable of adaptively modulating itself to changes to maintain a uniform cerebral blood flow.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Mar 28, 2018

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