Value of continuous video EEG and EEG responses to thermesthesia stimulation in prognosis evaluation of comatose patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Value of continuous video EEG and EEG responses to thermesthesia stimulation in prognosis... AbstractObjectiveTo investigate the clinical value of video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and thermal stimulus on evaluating the prognosis of comatose patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.MethodsTwenty eight comatose patients with cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included in the department of ICU of the First Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University from February 2013 to March 2016. Of the included 28 patients, 20 cases died (death group) and 8 cases survived (survival group) after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The VEEG, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and APACHE II score were recorded and compared between the death and survival group. The prediction value of death for VEEG, GCS and APACHE II were evaluated through sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC).ResultsGCS and APACHEH II score were statistical different between the death and survival group (P<0.05). With the increase of VEEG grading, the mortality rate of patients increased significantly (P<0.05). Predicting value of mortality for GCS, VEEG and APACHEH II were 57.69%, 61.54% and 71.43% respectively without statistical difference (P>0.05). The death prediction sensitivity and specificity for GCS were 67.0% and 85.0%, for APACHEH II were 95.1% and 85.0%, for VEEG were 100.0% and 85.2%. VEEG has the highest sensitivity, Specificity, coincidence rate and Kappa vale compared to GCS, and APACHEH II.ConclusionVideo-electroencephalography is a useful tool for predicting the death risk for patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Open Medicine de Gruyter

Value of continuous video EEG and EEG responses to thermesthesia stimulation in prognosis evaluation of comatose patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018 Qiu Jianmin et al., published by De Gruyter
ISSN
2391-5463
eISSN
2391-5463
D.O.I.
10.1515/med-2018-0006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractObjectiveTo investigate the clinical value of video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and thermal stimulus on evaluating the prognosis of comatose patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.MethodsTwenty eight comatose patients with cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included in the department of ICU of the First Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University from February 2013 to March 2016. Of the included 28 patients, 20 cases died (death group) and 8 cases survived (survival group) after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The VEEG, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and APACHE II score were recorded and compared between the death and survival group. The prediction value of death for VEEG, GCS and APACHE II were evaluated through sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC).ResultsGCS and APACHEH II score were statistical different between the death and survival group (P<0.05). With the increase of VEEG grading, the mortality rate of patients increased significantly (P<0.05). Predicting value of mortality for GCS, VEEG and APACHEH II were 57.69%, 61.54% and 71.43% respectively without statistical difference (P>0.05). The death prediction sensitivity and specificity for GCS were 67.0% and 85.0%, for APACHEH II were 95.1% and 85.0%, for VEEG were 100.0% and 85.2%. VEEG has the highest sensitivity, Specificity, coincidence rate and Kappa vale compared to GCS, and APACHEH II.ConclusionVideo-electroencephalography is a useful tool for predicting the death risk for patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Journal

Open Medicinede Gruyter

Published: Mar 15, 2018

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