Unpredictable pain timings lead to greater pain when people are highly intolerant of uncertainty

Unpredictable pain timings lead to greater pain when people are highly intolerant of uncertainty AbstractBackground and purposeMany psychological factors are known to influence pain perception. Among them, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) may play a key modulating role in situations where uncertainty prevails, especially uncertainty regarding the timing of painful events. The objective of this study was to explore the impact of individual differences in IUon pain perception during predictable and unpredictable stimulation timings. We hypothesized that people with high IU, as opposed to those with low IU, would perceive more pain when the timing of painful stimulations cannot be predicted, as compared to when they can.MethodsTwenty (20) healthy adults, aged between 18 and 35 years old, were recruited. Painful sensations were provoked using transcutaneous electrical stimulations of the right sural nerve. By measuring IU (Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale) and subjective pain (verbal numerical rating scale), it was possible to test the relationship between IU and pain perception, by simulating predictable and unpredictable painful experiences. This was done through cued shock interval (CSI) blocks, with either variable timing or fixed timings (long or short time frame). Self-administered questionnaires were also used to measure pain hypervigilance, pain catastrophizing, state anxiety, and trait anxiety.ResultsPearson correlations confirmed the presence of an association (r = 0.63) between IU and the change in pain intensity provoked by unpredictable stimulation timings. Importantly, this association was significant only for stimulations provided at long CSIs, indicating that higher IU scores predicted higher pain intensity scores when stimulation timings became unpredictable, and when the cued delay was long. No association was found between pain scores and other psychological variables.ConclusionsOur results show that IU moderately correlates to the change in pain intensity provoked by unpredictable stimulation timings. High IU scores were associated with a worsening of the subjective pain experience, especially during long delays in an unpredictable situation. These observations suggest that IU could be considered as a psychological variable that is able to influence pain perception in certain situations.ImplicationsAssessing and addressing IU could be an added value in pain-related therapy, especially in chronic pain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Unpredictable pain timings lead to greater pain when people are highly intolerant of uncertainty

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/unpredictable-pain-timings-lead-to-greater-pain-when-people-are-highly-va3W3zcVjO
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.09.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground and purposeMany psychological factors are known to influence pain perception. Among them, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) may play a key modulating role in situations where uncertainty prevails, especially uncertainty regarding the timing of painful events. The objective of this study was to explore the impact of individual differences in IUon pain perception during predictable and unpredictable stimulation timings. We hypothesized that people with high IU, as opposed to those with low IU, would perceive more pain when the timing of painful stimulations cannot be predicted, as compared to when they can.MethodsTwenty (20) healthy adults, aged between 18 and 35 years old, were recruited. Painful sensations were provoked using transcutaneous electrical stimulations of the right sural nerve. By measuring IU (Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale) and subjective pain (verbal numerical rating scale), it was possible to test the relationship between IU and pain perception, by simulating predictable and unpredictable painful experiences. This was done through cued shock interval (CSI) blocks, with either variable timing or fixed timings (long or short time frame). Self-administered questionnaires were also used to measure pain hypervigilance, pain catastrophizing, state anxiety, and trait anxiety.ResultsPearson correlations confirmed the presence of an association (r = 0.63) between IU and the change in pain intensity provoked by unpredictable stimulation timings. Importantly, this association was significant only for stimulations provided at long CSIs, indicating that higher IU scores predicted higher pain intensity scores when stimulation timings became unpredictable, and when the cued delay was long. No association was found between pain scores and other psychological variables.ConclusionsOur results show that IU moderately correlates to the change in pain intensity provoked by unpredictable stimulation timings. High IU scores were associated with a worsening of the subjective pain experience, especially during long delays in an unpredictable situation. These observations suggest that IU could be considered as a psychological variable that is able to influence pain perception in certain situations.ImplicationsAssessing and addressing IU could be an added value in pain-related therapy, especially in chronic pain.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off